NBA: 11 Lessons Every Player Needs to Take From Phil Jackson

Management and leadership advice comes in a host of forms. Conferences, seminars, articles written by CEOs and other corporate executives all detail the path to achieving cohesion in the workplace, or how to be a stronger leader. But the leaders of the boardroom aren’t the only people who know a thing or two about managing difficult personalities, or how to exercise authority.

Retired NBA coach and player Phil Jackson released Eleven Rings in May 2013. The book is a memoir about his values, leadership style, and other factors that contributed to his unprecedented eleven NBA championship rings as a coach. Jackson enumerates the 11 principles that assisted his career, and why they are important for everyday life — not just court-side coaching.

NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 18:  Phil Jackson stands for photos during his introductory press conference as President of the New York Knicks at Madison Square Garden on March 18, 2014 in New York City.  (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)

Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

1. Lead from the inside-out

When you lead from the outside-in, Jackson says, you may have short-term success, but it can’t last. No one wants to be repeatedly “brow-beaten,” and your opponents will eventually discover your game plan. “As time went by, I discovered that the more I spoke from the heart, the more players could hear me and benefit from what I gleaned.”