Cadillac Previews the New XT5 Crossover SUV

2017 Cadillac XT5

Source: Cadillac

What you’re looking at above is the broom with which Cadillac will whisk away the SRX crossover. Dubbed the XT5 after Caddy CEO Johan de Nysschen’s trademark nomenclature, the new SUV will replace the only vehicle in the roster that hasn’t yet gotten a comprehensive redesign — and arguably, the most important one.

The SRX has been long in the tooth for sometime, but amazingly, it still sells in strong numbers. Cadillac has instead been focusing more on revitalizing the Escalade, and its historically lackluster sedan portfolio, which despite the improvements, have been struggling to find footing in today’s cutthroat luxury market.

2017 Cadillac XT5

Source: Cadillac

Undergoing only minor cosmetic changes since its introduction in 2010, the SRX still plays a vital role in Cadillac’s stable. Compact crossovers have been as big a boon for luxury names as they have been for more conventional brands, and without an up-to-date fighter of BMW’s X3, Mercedes’ new GLC, the new Lexus NX, and the all-new Lincoln MKX, Cadillac risks losing a big piece of an enormous pie.

Fortunately, the XT5 looks ready to take on that segment with gusto. It’s undeniably an attractive vehicle, with Caddy’s sharp and angular styling giving it a simple elegance all around. Its taillights resemble those found on the ELR (a dud under the hood, but also a terrific looking vehicle), and overall, the chrome has been done tastefully — seemingly a difficult task for GM’s chrome-heavy hands (check out the new Sierra for proof).

2017 Cadillac XT5

Source: Cadillac

Photos aside, details are scant to non-existent on virtually everything. Those it’s likely to see at least a small uptick in price, as it has Lincoln’s MKX to contend with that starts at $38,100 (the current SRX starts at ($37,605). The new Mercedes GLC pricing hasn’t been announced, though the GLK starts at $37,900. It’s a similar story for the Audi Q5, BMW X3, and Lexus NX, and serves to provide a baseline for where we can expect the pricing for the XT5 to fall.

As far as powertrains go, it wouldn’t be surprising to see the XT5 delivered with a 2.0 liter four-cylinder as standard, with GM’s smooth 3.6 liter six-cylinder as an optional extra. In other applications, the six can provide as much as 464 horsepower in the ATS-V (with the help of two turbos), but expect something closer to the current SRX’s 308.

The turbo-four, meanwhile, produces 272 horsepower in the ATS, more than enough to be competitive in the crossover segment. Though Caddy also offers a naturally aspirated 2.5 liter four (202 horsepower), we don’t think it’ll end up in the XT5 as the brand continues efforts to push its brand and performance image upstream.

Between the XT5, Escalade, and hopefully the CT6 sedan, Cadillac will once again be fielding a formidable luxury portfolio that can help it reclaim the “Standard of the World.” Though its sedans are struggling, the 21st century consumer is all about SUVs — look at the new Bentley Bentayga for any indication that the big money is on opulent utilities. So far, the XT5 looks like a strong foundation to build its hopes, dreams, and aspirations on moving forward.

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