Ford Needs More: Set to Hire New White-Collar Workers

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Ford Motor Co.(NYSE:F) is issuing good news again. According to The Detroit News, the Dearborn automaker announced Monday that it will be adding 800 white-collar U.S. workers to its lineup over the next six months — a boost that will eventually bring the automaker’s salaried head count to above 30,000.

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The move is part of Ford’s largest single-year salaried hiring effort in more than 10 years, and it follows an announcement the automaker made earlier in the year when it added 2,200 new salaried jobs to its workforce. Now, Ford is interested in adding workers to its bustling engineering, information technology, product development and manufacturing segments.

And Ford is not the only automaker in Detroit’s Big Three that has worked to employ more and more employees this year. General Motors Co. (NYSE:GM), too, is in the process of adding 4,000 white-collar jobs at four of its IT Innovation Centers.

The new hiring targets are sources of pride for the U.S. automakers that almost hit rock bottom after the 2008 financial crisis. The number of Ford salaried workers sunk to its lowest count in 2009 at around 25,000 workers. However, the company has since made steady progress. Though Ford started the year with about 28,400 salaried workers — 10,000 fewer than it had in 2006 — its new 3,000 white-collar jobs will bring its total to over 30,000.

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Now that Ford’s vehicle sales are up 13 percent this year, the company is running at maximum capacity, and its new hiring target reflects its need to expand in order to “meet surging customer demand for our top-selling cars, utilities, and trucks.” To help meet this need, Ford will also add more than 3,000 hourly workers at its Flat Rock and Kansas City assembly plants.

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