The 16 U.S. Cities That Love Coffee the Most

No matter which side you favor in the coffee or tea debate, there’s no denying java is one of the most popular drinks in the United States. The fact that Americans have no problem spending money at the worst coffee chains underscores coffee’s popularity. But which places love coffee the most? Let’s tour the 16 U.S. cities that love coffee the most.

SmartAsset studied coffee trends nationwide and scored cities around the country. We’ll structure our countdown based on the number of coffee shops per capita (100,000 people), including a city we didn’t expect at No. 8.

15. Denver (TIE)

Denver

It’s not all marijuana and craft beer in Denver.| F11photo/iStock/Getty Images

Coffee shops per capita: 128

Even though Denver is more famous for its marijuana consumption and craft beer selection, it’s one of the U.S. cities that love coffee the most. According to SmartAsset, the Mile High City has seven coffee and tea manufacturers and 890 coffee shops.

Next: Let’s stay out west.

15. Reno, Nev. (TIE)

Reno, Nevada downtown

Reno is a great place for coffee-lovers. | ddub3429/iStock/Getty Images

Coffee shops per capita: 128

While Reno is one of the most sinful cities in America, it’s also a great place for coffee-lovers. It has one of the highest rates of coffeehouses per capita, and the average price of a cappuccino ($3.67) is among the lowest in the SmartAsset study.

Next: This city is famous for drinking something different.

14. New Orleans

Bars with neon lights in the French Quarter of New Orleans

Coffee isn’t hard to find in New Orleans after a night out in the French Quarter. | f11photo/iStock/Getty Images

Coffee shops per capita: 131

Louisiana isn’t one of the drunkest states in the U.S., but people associate New Orleans with imbibing thanks to Mardi Gras. After a long night in the French Quarter, the Crescent City is ready to help you through the morning with abundant and cheap coffee.

Next: Take the bad with the good over a cup of coffee.

13. San Diego

San Diego, California,

San Diego’s people and coffee scene are both friendly. | Sean Pavone/iStock/Getty Images

Coffee shops per capita: 135

Sure, San Diego has its negatives, such as too many stolen cars and expensive real estate that will ruin your home buying budget. On the flip side, it has some of the nicest people in the U.S., and it’s one of the cities that love coffee the most.

Next: We don’t think this city’s appearance is surprising.

12. Minneapolis

Minnesota

A look at downtown Minneapolis. | Gian Lorenzo Ferretti Photography/iStock/Getty Images

Coffee shops per capita: 145

We’re not surprised seeing Minneapolis on this list. Residents practically need hot coffee to get through the long, cold winters. It’s also one of the most educated cities in America, so it’s easy to find plenty of intelligent discussions at the coffee shop during a whiteout blizzard.

Next: This city loves all kind of beverages.

10. Spokane, Wash. (TIE)

Spokane, Washington

A fresh cup of coffee would make this beautiful view even better. | csfotoimages/iStock/Getty Images

Coffee shops per capita: 148

The people in Spokane love alcohol, and it’s one of the booziest cities in the U.S. As it turns out, the town loves coffee, too. It has at least 319 coffeehouses, and the average price of a cappuccino is just $3.69.

Next: No matter how you look at it, this city loves its java.

10. Oakland, Calif. (TIE)

oakland california

Oakland is definitely one of the cities that love coffee the most. | trekandshoot/iStock/Getty Images Plus

Coffee shops per capita: 148

No matter how you look at it, Oakland is one of the U.S. cities that love coffee. Residents Google search for coffee more than the national average. The city has more than 620 coffee shops. The average price for a cappuccino is less than $4.00, and it has one of the highest rates of coffeehouses per capita.

Next: A river city layover before we head back west.

9. Cincinnati

Cincinnati downtown early in the night

Coffee is part of the fun in Cincinnati. | AndreyKrav/iStock/Getty Images

Coffee shops per capita: 149

Did you know that Cincinnati is one of the most fun cities in the U.S.? Well, now you do, and you also know the city loves its coffee, too. You won’t have trouble finding a fresh brew as the city boast more than 440 coffeehouses.

Next: This city’s appearance is surprising.

8. Sacramento, Calif.

Sacramento

If you didn’t know about Sacramento’s coffee culture before, you do now. | casch/ iStock/ Getty Images

Coffee shops per capita: 158

San Diego wasn’t a surprise, and neither was Bay Area metropolis Oakland. Sacramento as one of the cities that love coffee, on the other hand, is a surprise. We associate California’s capital with toxic pollution and bad NBA basketball, but if you can get past those two negatives, then you’ll find some great coffee.

Next: It’s not just football and sandwiches in this town.

7. Pittsburgh

Steelers Fan

Pittsburgh’s not about just football and sandwiches. | Gregory Shamus/Getty Images

Coffee shops per capita: 195

Pittsburgh isn’t all about the Steelers and beloved sandwiches. After lunch and a football game, there’s no shortage of hotspots is this coffee-loving city. SmartAsset counted nearly 600 coffee shops in town.

Next: This city has coffee-lovers covered.

6. Las Vegas

McCarran Las Vegas Airport

Las Vegas has you covered when you need a caffeine boost. | littleny/iStock/Getty Images

Coffee shops per capita: 212

When you need a caffeine boost while you’re gambling at the casino, Las Vegas has you covered. Sin City boasts more than 1,300 coffeehouses, which is one for every 212 people in town.

Next: A similar number of coffee shops to a city three times bigger.

5. Miami

Miami, Florida,

You’re never far from a coffeehouse in Miami. | SeanPavonePhoto/iStock/Getty Images

Coffee shops per capita: 227

Miami has a large Cuban population and coffee is incredibly popular there, and we have to believe it impacts Miami’s standing on the list. According to the SmartAsset study, it has a similar number of coffee shops as Philadelphia, a city with three times as many people.

Next: Here’s the obvious one.

4. Seattle

Starbuck coffee

Starbucks might be Seattle’s most famous export. | Bensib/iStock/Getty Images

Coffee shops per capita: 230

The city that gave us Starbucks and all its overrated drinks finally shows up on the list. The folks in the Emerald City love their coffee, and it shows. They Google the word “coffee” 144% more often than the rest of the country.

Next: A city similar to Seattle in at least one way.

3. Portland, Ore.

biker in portland, oregon

Just one of the many coffee shops in Portland. | Craig Mitchelldyer/Getty Images

Coffee shops per capita: 233

Portland is similar to Seattle in at least one way — it’s one of the cities that love coffee the most. The City of Roses boasts 20 coffee and tea manufacturers, which is more than any other metropolis in the SmartAsset study. Coffee’s health benefits help Portland earn another distinction — one of the healthiest cities in America.

Next: Now boarding.

2. Honolulu

Honolulu, Hawaii

Great views, great coffee selection. | Sorincolac/iStock/Getty Images

Coffee shops per capita: 248

If you love a cup of joe, then you’ll feel at home in Honolulu. The city has nearly 900 coffee shops in town, so you’re never far from your caffeine fix. The only downside is the high prices, but the cost probably doesn’t matter to all of Honolulu’s many millionaires.

Next: This city has to have some coffee bargains, right?

1. San Francisco

San Francisco

San Francisco is a coffee mecca. | Heyengel/iStock/Getty Images

Coffee shops per capita: 279

San Francisco and the Silicon Valley are so expensive that even tech industry professionals making six-figure salaries can barely afford to live there. High prices extend to the coffee, as the $4.34 average cost of a cappuccino is second only to Honolulu. But the city houses over 2,400 coffee shops (more than Chicago), and there’s bound to be a few bargains out there, right?

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