What John McCain’s Shocking Rejection Means for the Latest Health Care Bill

In the latest installment of “Republicans trying to repeal and replace Obamacare,” Senators Lindsey Graham (R) and Bill Cassidy (R) have co-sponsored a bill to repeal and replace Obamacare. This will mark more than 50 attempts made to repeal and/or replace the American Health Care Act (ACA). The Graham-Cassidy bill was largely considered to be a solid compromise of what many Republicans hated about the attempts before, but apparently, that is not true.

McCain deals Graham-Cassidy an early death blow

(L) Lyndsey Graham & (R) John McCain

(L) Lyndsey Graham and (R) John McCain | AFP/Getty Images

Senator John McCain tweeted out that he “could not in good conscience” vote for the Graham-Cassidy proposal. John McCain and three other Republican were left undecided on the impending vote for the Graham-Cassidy bill, designed to repeal and replace the ACA. After reviewing the legislation, he released his statement saying that he was not going to support the bill at all. “Without a full CBO score, which won’t be available by the end of the month, we won’t have reliable answers to any of those questions.”

Next: What does this mean for the Graham-Cassidy bill?

How will this affect the vote?

US Senator John McCain looks on during a meeting with Afghan Chief Executive Officer Abdullah Abdullah at the Sapedar Palace in Kabul on December 25, 2014. Mccain met with Afghanistan's CEO Abdullah Abdullah in Kabul on December 25, less than a week before the December 31 end of NATO's combat mission in the country. NATO-led US troops are wrapping up their mission in Afghanistan after 13 years, but about 12,500 NATO troops -- most of them from the US -- will stay in Afghanistan into next year on a follow-up mission to support the national security forces. Photo by Wakil Kohsar/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Senator John McCain looks on during a meeting with Afghan Chief Executive Officer Abdullah Abdullah. | Wakil Kohsar/AFP/Getty Images

Republicans need a simple majority vote in the Senate by September 30. After that, they would need 60 votes. As it stands right now, just a couple more people need to vote “no” outside of the Senate Democrats. Rand Paul (R-Indiana) has expressed his intention to not support the bill, while Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) has said she is leaning towards a “no” vote as well.

Next: Why even some Republicans are concerned with the new bill.

The Graham-Cassidy bill is deeply flawed and it’s not hard to see why

U.S. Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-LA) (L) and Rep. Pete Sessions (R-TX)

U.S. Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-LA) (L) and Rep. Pete Sessions (R-TX) | Alex Wong/Getty Images

The Graham-Cassidy bill would essentially remove federal oversight in health care, and eliminate basic care requirements like prescription drugs and maternity care. It would also restrict funding for Planned Parenthood. So far the bill has not been evaluated by the Congressional Budget Office, a process that is expected to take a month to calculate its impact on Americans. These are many of the reasons why McCain and other Republican senators are opposing the bill, with supporters trying to rush it through before anyone has time to evaluate its potential impact.

Next: McCain is not acting out of the norm.

McCain has gotten in the way of ‘repeal and replace’ before

Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) attempts to wink

Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) attempts to wink. | Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The last time that Republicans had a health care bill in the Senate, McCain and a couple other Senators famously shut down the bill entirely. The So-Called “skinny repeal” was an attempt to settle disagreements across the Republican Party, and was an extremely watered down version of what the Republican party wanted. For some, it didn’t go far enough in scaling back the ACA, while for others, it was seen as potentially harmful to the health care system as a whole.

Next: Republican infighting is becoming more and more common.

Republicans do not have their house in order

U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) (2nd L) speaks as (L-R) Sen. John Barrasso (R-WY), Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-LA), Sen. John Thune (R-SD), and Senate Majority Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY)

U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) (second L) speaks as (L-R) Sen. John Barrasso (R-WY), Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-LA), Sen. John Thune (R-SD), and Senate Majority Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY) look on. | Alex Wong/Getty Images

Republicans have notoriously failed to pass meaningful legislation in recent years. This is largely because the party is a house divided. Ideologies are in constant conflict, and everyone wants a say in the future of our government. But with so many factions throughout the party, as well as the increasing divide among the American people, there’s no telling if the Republican Party will ever actually have control.

Conversely, the Democrats have been steadfast in preventing any legislation pass that would damage Obamacare (while admittedly squabbling amongst themselves on other key issues). Add that to the fact that a good deal of Republican constituents now support many of the core functions of Obamacare, and the Republican party is going to have a tough election season come 2018.

Next: Why do Republicans want to push this bill through so fast?

Republicans are scrambling to fulfill their campaign promises

Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) rushes to the Senate chamber to vote

Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) rushes to the Senate chamber to vote. | Win McNamee/Getty Images

Republicans have been promising to repeal and replace the ACA ever since it was first passed. Now, they finally have an opportunity to do so by controlling all three branches of government. Even with the majority of the House and Senate under their control, they have not been able to pass much in the way of meaningful legislation. So now, they are trying to go for the one promise that they have been vowing to fulfill for the better part of seven years.

Next: Where does this leave us with health care?

No one really knows how this will all pan out

Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-LA) shows that he does have arms, just like a real human

Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-LA) shows that he does have arms, just like a real human. | Jonathan Bachman/Getty Images

Yes, John McCain said he will not vote for the bill in its current form, but that does not mean he won’t vote for a different version later on. So for today, Obama care is safe. Protections for pre-existing conditions, maternity care, prescriptions, and all the other benefits of the ACA will stay intact. But every day it seems Republicans come up with yet another way to take away something the majority of Americans want.