‘Blue Bloods’: Why You Won’t See a Detective with a Buttoned Jacket

Blue Bloods fans not only love the show’s storylines but also the accuracy. The producers and writers take time to make sure each scene follows what would typically happen within the New York City Police Department. Here’s why you won’t see a Blue Bloods detective with a buttoned jacket.

Tom Selleck says the ‘Blue Bloods’ team works hard to make sure everything looks authentic

Donnie Wahlberg and Marisa Ramirez on Blue Bloods | Craig Blankenhorn/CBS via Getty Images
Donnie Wahlberg and Marisa Ramirez on Blue Bloods | Craig Blankenhorn/CBS via Getty Images

In a special interview with CBS, Tom Selleck says the Blue Bloods team does research to ensure the accuracy of the show. The writers and producers make an effort to deliver episodes that look as real as possible. “We do a lot of research about the NYPD. It’s an organization that I’m proud to represent,” said Selleck.

This is the secret weapon of ‘Blue Bloods’

Blue Bloods technical consultant Jim Nuciforo (middle) with panelists | Heather Wines/CBS via Getty Images
Blue Bloods technical consultant Jim Nuciforo (middle) with panelists | Heather Wines/CBS via Getty Images

Jim Nuciforo, the Blue Bloods technical consultant and associate producer, is responsible for making sure the show is accurate. The cast often consults him when they need advice on how a police officer would behave in certain situations. Here’s what Nuciforo said in a CBS interview about his job:

I was a detective in New York City for just under 24 years, both with the New York City transit police and with the NYPD. And I try to bring the NYPD reality to the show. For me, for being former NYPD, it’s important to get it right. In the past, I would watch shows, as does every other cop in America, and say ‘Oh, come on. They wouldn’t do it that way,’ or ‘It doesn’t happen that way.’ I try to keep that to a minimum. The showrunner, Kevin Wade, likes to get it as real as possible. And I’ve done many other shows, but this show wants to get it right more than any show I’ve ever worked on.

The reason you won’t see a detective with a buttoned jacket

Donnie Wahlberg as Danny Reagan | Patrick Harbron/CBS via Getty Images
Donnie Wahlberg as Danny Reagan | Patrick Harbron/CBS via Getty Images

Nuciforo says one detail he pays attention to is whether the detectives on the show button their jackets. He tells CBS that a real detective wouldn’t button his jacket. “As a detective, never button your jacket. If you have your jacket buttoned and you need your gun in a split second, in an emergency situation, you’ll be gone before you ever get a chance to go for your gun,” said Nuciforo.

These details are often missed in police shows and movies

Will Estes and Donnie Wahlberg |  Patrick Harbron/CBS via Getty Images
Will Estes and Donnie Wahlberg | Patrick Harbron/CBS via Getty Images

It’s common to see a detective in a movie or TV show knock on the door and ask for a suspect. However, Nuciforo tells CBS this isn’t the way it’s usually done:

Let’s say we’re going to a house to look for somebody. It’s really rare that you have a warrant to go in and get somebody. So, a lot of the time you have to knock on that door and finesse them out. So, when you knock on the door, let’s say I was looking for myself. I don’t want to go and say, ‘Hi, is Jim Nuciforo home?’ Well, they see I’m a detective, they know I’m a detective; I’m going to identify myself.

But by saying, ‘Is Jim Nuciforo home, just in those few seconds, they’re going to say, ‘Oh, a detective, Jim is in trouble–no, he’s not home, what can I help you with?’ So, instead of saying, ‘Is Jim Nuciforo home, when they answer that door, I say, ‘Go get Jim Nuciforo.’ They think I know he’s in the house already, and then they’ll go and get him and bring him out.

Nuciforo also tells CBS another detail where mistakes are often made on television, and even in real life, is with crime scenes. Sometimes, a television show will have a detective lifting the sheet that’s covering a dead body. However, Nuciforo says this isn’t necessary. “Quite often, you’ll see either in television or in real life, a detective comes to the scene, and he’ll lift the covering on the body to see what’s going on there. There’s really nothing for that detective to see. Crime scene is going to come and process that body.”

Read more: ‘Blue Bloods’: What the Cast Thought of Tom Selleck When They First Met

Check out Showbiz Cheat Sheet on Facebook!