Disney+ Users Reportedly Already Having Security Issues With the Streaming Platform

Perhaps the public is so used to news of a major company being hacked nowadays, they hardly bat an eye. When everyone hears it came from Disney+, maybe more than a few perk up their ears to listen.

Hearing from Disney that it’s possibly only a “small amount of users” may also disconcert those who fear for the safety of their personal information.

After a few weeks fraught with a few technical issues at Disney+, no doubt Disney was taken aback to realize their streaming site was a victim of a major hack.

Those who signed up for an account may want to know more information, though Disney isn’t currently releasing information on which accounts were compromised. Then again, should they provide more information for those concerned?

How many users were affected by the first week’s technical issues?

Disney+ | NICK AGRO/AFP via Getty Images

One could argue Disney wasn’t quite prepared for the 10 million users that signed up for the platform on November 12. Several million users had trouble accessing their accounts in the first 24 hours because the servers Disney was using couldn’t keep up with the streaming demand.

When close to 10 million people stream at once, it’s obvious things are going to crash. Over time, it leveled out, but clearly everyone was collectively checking out the movies and shows available there, undoubtedly with 4K streaming on their smart TVs.

If Disney ultimately cleared up this issue, little did users know they were vulnerable to having their accounts stolen by hackers. The Mouse House should have seen this coming considering they’re the most-anticipated and precedent-setting streaming platform ever.

According to some security sites, it’s a bit alarming Disney isn’t really taking the hack attack as seriously as one would hope. Or maybe they are and just not talking about it too much to avoid giving hackers information.

What are the details on the hacking attack?

All reports say the hacking and stealing of accounts at Disney+ occurred at some point during the first week. Sources like ZDNet say “thousands” of accounts were compromised. The hackers hijacked these accounts and then put them up for sale on the dark web for other hackers to buy (at $3 per account) and use.

Some reports have come out about users noticing their screen names and passwords being changed because of dark web users buying the stolen accounts. A few have said they simply canceled their account because Disney did nothing to amend the problem for some users.

From the Disney side, they seem to be unworried about it since they said a small number of users were victims compared to the over 10 million users already signed up. Yet, should they be doing more damage control on this in a time when everyone feels unsafe in the digital realms?

ZDNet reportedly tried to reach out to Disney to ask them what kind of security they’re using. The company didn’t respond to ZDNet immediately.

A company as huge as Disney shouldn’t be complacent

Let’s all figure Disney likely has some of the best digital security people in the world working for them. Not giving away too much of that information to the universe so they can stay one step ahead of hackers is a vital point.

One major problem with companies being hacked is they don’t invest enough in cybersecurity and assume the security they do have will thwart hackers. In truth, hackers are usually several steps ahead of major corporations.

Having major media companies being this vulnerable and complacent might sound dangerous. Looking at Disney, they simply can’t be that ignorant on how to amend the issue.

The least Disney can do is email all users and give them the facts so latter can take proper steps. As cybersecurity experts say, multi-factor authentication is really the best security there is for not only Disney, but all big streaming services here now and upcoming.