‘Game of Thrones’ Season 8 ‘Jenny’s Song’ Contains Some Serious Foreshadowing for the Claim to the Iron Throne

The second installment of Game of Thrones’ final season featured some heavy foreshadowing, but not in the ways fans expected. The episode, “A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms,” featured a song straight from the pages of George R. R. Martin’s books that could hold clues about the fate of Jon Snow (Kit Harington) and Daenerys Targaryn (Emilia Clarke).

'Game of Thrones' stars Emilia Clarke and Kit Harington
Emilia Clarke and Kit Harington | Photo by Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic for HBO

‘Jenny’s Song’

The scene in question happened while several characters – many of them knights – gathered in a hall on the eve of the battle for Winterfell. While the group drank away their worries, Tyrion Lannister (Peter Dinklage) asked if any of them knew a good song.

Podrick (Daniel Portman), better known as Brienne of Tarth’s (Selwyn Tarth) squire, was the only one who volunteered. In what was a somber moment for the company, Podrick sang:

“High in the halls of the kings who are gone, Jenny would dance with her ghosts. The ones she had lost and the ones she had found, the ones who had loved her the most.”

According to VOX, the song was also featured at the end of the installment, only this time it was performed by Florence + The Machine.

How is the song used in the books?

In the novels, the song refers to Jenny of Oldstones, who is romantically linked to Duncan Targaryen. Duncan was once in line to the Iron Throne, but he gave up the crown to marry Jenny. The show simplifies the Targaryen lineage and leaves Duncan out of the mix, but the important thing to remember is that he gave up his right to the throne for love.

There are a few obvious parallels to Jenny’s story and the show’s two main leads, Jon and Daenerys. The first is that Duncan gave up the throne to be with Jenny, something Jon may do with Daenerys. In the opening episode, Jon finally learned that he is really a Targaryen and has a right to the throne. Jon informed Daenerys of his true lineage in the second installment, though they were interrupted by the arrival of the White Walkers.

Daenerys Targaryen and Jon Snow
Emilia Clarke (Daenerys Targaryen) and Kit Harington (Jon Snow) | Photo by Helen Sloan/HBO

There is a good chance that Jon wants nothing to do with the Iron Throne – he was already hesitant to be named King of the North – and lets Daenerys rule Westeros. But Duncan and Jenny’s story doesn’t end with a happily ever after.

Jon Snow’s fate foreshadowed

In the books, Martin reveals that Duncan was killed, which is why Jenny’s song is so somber. If the song is foreshadowing, then Jon will also give up the throne only to be killed in battle. That would leave Daenerys to rule Westeros by her herself, assuming that she survives the fight to come and takes out Cersei (Lena Headey) in King’s Landing.

The Battle for Winterfell could change everything

Jenny’s story aside, the battle with the White Walkers will undoubtedly change everything. The Night King and his forces will likely destroy the majority of Daenerys and Jon’s forces, and they will be lucky to get out of the fight in one piece. If they somehow find a way to kill the Night King, they still have Cersei to deal with, who is sitting comfortably in King’s Landing with 20,000 troops at her command.

Suffice it to say that the odds of Jon and Daenerys getting out of Winterfell alive and taking the Iron Throne are slim. We should learn more in episode three, which could very well feature the largest battle the show has ever seen. We can only hope that Jon does not suffer the same fate as Duncan, but things aren’t looking good at the moment.

Season 8 of Game of Thrones continues Sunday nights on HBO.