George Wallace’s Bid to Host the Oscars Came Up Just Short and Whatnot

Comedian George Wallace and Kevin Hart pose together at a benefit in 2015. | Jason Kempin/Getty Images

As is the case with so many things these days, it began with a tweet. “Breaking: Nobody wants to host the Oscars,” wrote Matthew Belloni of The Hollywood Reporter. Belloni linked to a story he’d just published calling the Oscars “the least wanted job in Hollywood.”

But at least one capable man disagreed. Comedian George Wallace, known for his Vegas stand-up act and hilarious Twitter feed (along with 52 acting credits), begged to differ with Belloni’s take on the subject.


From there, Wallace began an open audition that had Twitter in stitches for the next few hours. Along with his theoretical pairing of Streep and Sinbad, Wallace suggested bringing out ’90s R&B group Boys II Men to do a song.

He also riffed on new ways to introduce Best Animated Feature (or “long-ass cartoons”) and had another dream pairing (“a British lady and Weird Al Yankovic”). At that point, Wallace was ready to pitch his services and step into the role.


Soon enough, fans both with and without invitations to the Oscars began voicing their support. Among them was none other than the man who played Luke Skywalker.

Wallace lost out to Kevin Hart, who announced he was hosting.

George Wallace | Ethan Miller/Getty Images

While the groundswell to have Wallace host this year’s Oscars was stronger than ever, Kevin Hart announced (on Instagram, of all places) he would be handling the job. So that ended the suspense, and Wallace graciously stepped aside. (“I laughed. I cried. I made sweet love five and a half times.”)

However, that didn’t erase the enthusiasm Wallace’s fellow comedians had already communicated on Twitter. Ben Schwartz (of Parks and Recreation fame) and Patton Oswalt had by then voiced their support as well.

Comparing Hart’s boilerplate acceptance speech and Wallace’s pitch was no contest. In fact, Wallace had the sort of topical jokes you know Hart will avoid at the big event.

“Great to be hosting The Oscars,” Wallace tweeted. “This year we were treated to shadowy secrets, sinister, horrifying villains and jaw-dropping make-believe. But enough about the Brett Kavanaugh confirmation.”

In his finest moment of the afternoon, Wallace roasted one Oscars tradition on an open fire.

Every year, people say they want something different. In 2019, they could have had it in George Wallace. Is it too late to make it happen?

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