‘NCIS’: Gibbs Has Become a Horrible Employee

NCIS” has taken many twists and turns throughout the last 17 seasons. One twist fans never saw coming was the decline in Gibbs’ work quality. He used to run a tight ship, but it seems things have gone downhill ever since he admitted to killing someone. Although Gibbs is the boss and he leads a team of agents, he still reports to director Leon Vance. He seems to have forgotten he’s still an employee who answers to someone. We wouldn’t be surprised if Vance gives Gibbs a warning or even fires him.

Gibbs hasn’t been taking his job seriously. He’s been leaving the building early, handing off complicated assignments to subordinates, and showing up late to work. In a recent episode, he even invited a 9-year-old to help solve a murder case. Gibbs’ decision-making skills are clearly not what they used to be.

Mark Harmon as Leroy Jethro Gibbs on NCIS |  Sonja Flemming/CBS via Getty Images
Mark Harmon as Leroy Jethro Gibbs on NCIS | Sonja Flemming/CBS via Getty Images

If you’ve become like Gibbs and you’re having trouble getting to work on time, how can you resolve the issue before you lose your job? Here’s what the experts told Showbiz Cheat Sheet.

Prepare ahead of time

Avoid the morning rush. If mornings are tough for you, take time to prepare the night before. It doesn’t feel good when you have to rush through breakfast and then rush to pick an outfit for work. Melanie Musson, a writer for InsuranceProviders.com, recommends deciding what you’ll eat for breakfast ahead of time and choosing a work outfit before you go to sleep. “Prep your breakfast the night before. Pick out your clothes before you go to bed,” suggests Musson.

Charlette Beasley, careers and workplace analyst at FitSmallBusiness.com, agrees. “The fewer decisions you have to make in the mornings, the better,” Beasly told Showbiz Cheat Sheet. “Waking up an hour earlier than normal is certainly a great start.”

Keep track of how often you’re late

Emily Wickersham Mark Harmon on NCIS |  Ali Goldstein/CBS via Getty Images
Emily Wickersham Mark Harmon on NCIS | Ali Goldstein/CBS via Getty Images

It’s difficult to make a real change if you don’t know what needs to be adjusted. Start by tracking how often you were late in the past month. Joshua Hastings, founder of MoneyLifeWax, says it’s not about the minutes but how your lateness impacts others. “Excessive lateness can be defined a few ways, but what it really boils down to is not seconds or minutes, but impact. If your lateness is impacting the production of a project or disrupting start times for meetings, it’s excessive. Getting caught in traffic occasionally isn’t excessive, but if it happens multiple times a week, you’re teetering on the side of excessive,” Hastings warned.

Don’t be like Gibbs, speak to your boss about your lateness

Rocky Carroll as Leon Vance on NCIS | Monty Brinton/CBS via Getty Images
Rocky Carroll as Leon Vance on NCIS | Monty Brinton/CBS via Getty Images

Gibbs hasn’t spoken to Vance about why he’s been late so often. Rather, he continues to act like he doesn’t answer to anyone and that his lateness doesn’t matter. Don’t be like Gibbs. It’s important to address your chronic lateness with your boss. If you continue to ignore the problem, you could end up losing your job. “Have a personal conversation with your supervisor or boss if you’re chronically late. Assuming they don’t know is most likely your first mistake. Chances are they know–and so do your co-workers! The more personal the conversation, the more trust you will build!” said Hastings.

Read more: ‘NCIS’: You’ll Be Surprised to Learn What the Show Is Really About

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