Why Is Comedy Central Being Called ‘Chump of the Week’ by ‘Detroiters’ fans?

Sam Richardson and Tim Robertson | Detroiters Instagram

In a move that made comedy lovers gasp, Comedy Central decided to deny fans another taste of Detroiters.

One of the show’s creators, Sam Richardson posted the show’s obit to Twitter. “Sadly, @Detroiters won’t be picked up for a season 3 at Comedy Central. I want to thank everyone who watched and supported the show. It was a dream to make and I’m proud that those who did see it enjoyed it. Maybe it will find a home elsewhere, who knows?” Comments to Richardson’s post were swift and dramatic as Detroiters cult fanbase expressed some serious distress.

“I’m handcuffing myself to the front door of Comedy Central hq,” was one response. Another follower posted, “One of the greatest shows ever made! Don’t be a chump, pick @Detroiters up!” This move most certainly would have been awarded Mort Crim’s “Chump of the Week.”  But maybe (just maybe) the show could follow the path of other amazingly hilarious canceled shows.

What is ‘Detroiters’ even about?

The fanbase is fierce. But describing the show can almost be a little challenging. Comedy writer Emily Heller, who writes for the dark HBO comedy Barry takes a good stab at it for Vulture.

“You know what’s weird? I’m not even sure I would want everyone to see it because I don’t know if it’s like a Schrödinger’s cat thing where observation would change the outcome,” she said. “But Detroiters is — and I clearly have a strong understanding of the concept of Schrödinger’s cat — a sitcom made by Tim Robinson and Sam Richardson about two best friends running an ad agency in Detroit, and they make exclusively terrible local commercials. God, the premise is so unimportant, but also super important because it’s such a show that lives and dies on its tone, and the tone is set by these terrible local commercials.”

The ultimate best friend comedy

Detroiters struck a chord with viewers because it provided the perfect blend of sophomoric fart humor with genuine love and affection between two best buds.  “The show, of course, scores its biggest laughs with their poorly executed madcap DIY commercials, but it avoids being mean-spirited at someone else’s expense,” Vulture reporter Erik Abriss wrote. “Even if the client is a ‘husky boy’ clothing store or a bad wig shop or Rick Mahorn, Detroiters avoids the easy joke and instead finds what’s alive within their client — because being alive is already inherently funny and embarrassing and dumb.”

Plus, even though the show weaves plenty of references only true Detroiters would know, you didn’t have to be from Detroit to laugh. In fact, Detroiters showcases some city traditions and made them hilarious. The annual Dream Cruise episode was the perfect example of how main characters Tim and Sam try to shake down clients who owe them money. Of course, they get stuck in the middle of a true Detroit tradition.

This may not be the end

Several Twitter followers are calling upon Netflix to pick up the series. Most recently, Brooklyn Nine-Nine, another cult comedy was rescued from the ashes. Fox canceled the comedy after a five-year run. But NBC swooped in and resurrected the show.

Other series that got a second chance on another network include Futurama, JAG, and even the iconic series, Taxi.  So it’s not over (until it’s over).

Check out The Cheat Sheet on Facebook!