Are You Social Media Savvy? Take This Quiz to Find Out

Getting the hang of popular social networks can be a complicated task. Figuring out how to use Instagram, for instance, sounds like a daunting task if you’ve never used the app before. And learning that there are lots of things you shouldn’t post on Facebook can really put a damper on your enthusiasm for the social network, even if you’ve been using it for years. But chances are good that you know more than you think you do, and you may be more social media savvy than you’d initially guess. Take our quiz to find out exactly how social media savvy you are, and to see if there are any areas that you need to brush up to stay current on all of the social networks we use everyday.

Questions

Woman typing on laptop

Test your social media knowledge with our quiz | iStock.com/StockRocket

1. The most popular social network in the world is:

A. YouTube
B. Facebook
C. Instagram

2. Hashtags connect your posts to popular topics, but should be used:

A. Sparingly — just a few hashtags at a time is enough
B. Prolifically — add as many hashtags as you can think of
C. Only occasionally — just when you can think of a hashtag that’s a perfect fit

3. When you post a photo or a video to Facebook, you:

A. Automatically give up all rights to that content
B. Give Facebook the license to display that content, but retain the copyright to it
C. Give up the copyright to that content unless you post a statement stating otherwise

4. You’re writing a post for your favorite social network. It’s OK to talk about:

A. Anything, as long as you keep your social media posts private
B. Most topics, even if you’re making your posts public
C. Select topics, but there are plenty of other topics that you shouldn’t post about on social networks

5. Snapchat lenses:

A. Are like filters that you can add after taking a photo
B. Add fun effects while you’re taking a photo or video
C. Are a way to check out what other people are posting about a location or topic

6. On Instagram, you can send messages and photos privately by:

A. Mentioning someone in the caption of your photo using the “@” symbol
B. Using the Instagram Direct feature
C. Posting photos to your story

7. If you find a photo that you like online, you can:

A. Repost or use it any way you like on social media, without any consequences
B. Use it only if you seek permission from the copyright owner
C. Use it, but expect to see some content deleted thanks to copyright complaints

8. What’s the difference between talking to someone in a Hangout versus a FaceTime?

A. Hangouts is a Google app, and FaceTime is Apple’s video call platform
B. FaceTime is just for two people, while Hangouts is for bigger groups
C. Hangouts involve voice calls, while FaceTime involves video calls

Man typing on laptop

Having social media knowledge is important today | iStock.com

9. If your Facebook posts are set to private, who can see them?

A. Only your friends
B. Your friends and anyone that your friends share your posts with
C. Your friends and their friends, but the visibility stops there

10. Other people can post photos of you:

A. That were taken when you were in public
B. That were taken at a private event or in a private home
C. That were taken anywhere, anytime

11. #TBT stands for:

A. Throwback Thursday
B. Throwback Tuesday
C. It doesn’t stand for anything, but is a popular caption when posting an older photo

12. Snapchat Stories are:

A. The captions you post under your photos
B. The series of photos and videos that you share with all your Snapchat friends
C. The photos and videos that you exchange privately with friends

13. The minimum age for making an account at Facebook is:

A. 13
B. 16
C. There’s no age minimum, just a box asking for parental consent

14. When confronted with government requests, most major social networks:

A. Won’t hand over your messages and data
B. Hand over your information if there’s a good reason to
C. Share your data without asking any questions

15. So you posted something negative about your employer or your workplace. Your boss can:

A. Fire you regardless of the kinds of comments you made
B. Terminate you or penalize you if there’s evidence that your comments were made with malicious intent
C. Your boss can’t do anything, regardless of the intent of your comments

16. If you’re a blogger or social media celeb and endorse a product you got for free, you:

A. Don’t have to disclose whether you were paid or received free items
B. Need to disclose the relationship, as per the Federal Trade Commission
C. Only need to disclose free products if you want to

Answers

Man holding smartphone and smiling

How many of these social media questions did you get right? | iStock.com

1. The most popular social network in the world is:

A. YouTube
B. Facebook
C. Instagram

Facebook is the most popular social network in the world, and in the United States it is significantly more popular than YouTube, Reddit, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Tumblr, LinkedIn, and other favorite social networks that you and your friends likely use.

2. Hashtags connect your posts to popular topics, but should be used:

A. Sparingly — just a few hashtags at a time is enough
B. Prolifically — add as many hashtags as you can think of
C. Only occasionally — just when you can think of a hashtag that’s a perfect fit

Hashtags are a great way to connect your posts to trending and popular topics and can make it easier for other people to find your content. But you should always make sure that you’re only adding hashtags that are strongly relevant for your posts. You should also avoid overloading your posts or photos with hashtags, since a giant block of tags can be annoying for your followers and friends.

3. When you post a photo or a video to Facebook, you:

A. Automatically give up all rights to that content
B. Give Facebook the license to display that content, but retain the copyright to it
C. Give up the copyright to that content unless you post a statement stating otherwise

Posting a photo on a major social network never means giving up the copyright to that content. You’re giving Facebook the license to display your photo or video. But don’t believe the Facebook hoax — the one that seems to resurface and circulate every few years — that claims that you’ll lose the copyright to your photos unless you copy and paste a status stating that you retain the copyright to your work. Not only is that statement unnecessary, but reposting it will make you look pretty gullible to your tech-savvy friends.

4. You’re writing a post for your favorite social network. It’s OK to talk about:

A. Anything, as long as you keep your social media posts private
B. Most topics, even if you’re making your posts public
C. Select topics, but there are plenty of other topics that you shouldn’t post about on social networks

While it might seem like it’s fine to discuss almost any topic in the privacy of a locked-down Facebook profile, that’s 100% not the case. In fact, there are plenty of things that you shouldn’t post on Facebook and other social networks. That includes data tied to your personal and financial security, anything that could clue a hacker in to your passwords, posts that share way too much personal information, photos that you want private, politically charged comments, or medical misinformation. Want the whole list? Check out our advice on what you shouldn’t post on Facebook or other social networks.

Man holding smartphone outside at night

You may be surprised to see that your information on Facebook is not as private as you think | Josep Lago/AFP/Getty Images

5. Snapchat lenses:

A. Are like filters that you can add after taking a photo
B. Add fun effects while you’re taking a photo or video
C. Are a way to check out what other people are posting about a location or topic

Even the most social media savvy user would be forgiven for getting this one wrong, since there are plenty of terms and features to keep track of on an app like Snapchat. Snapchat’s lenses add fun effects — like a flower crown or a cat face — as you’re capturing a photo or a video. Some even have effects for multiple faces, so that both you and a friend can get in on the fun. Snapchat, like other social networks, also has filters that you can apply after taking a photo, but those are different from (and slightly less fun than) lenses.

6. On Instagram, you can send messages and photos privately by:

A. Mentioning someone in the caption of your photo using the “@” symbol
B. Using the Instagram Direct feature
C. Posting photos to your story

Instagram recently added the ability to send messages and photos to your friends privately. You can do so by using the Instagram Direct feature, which is accessible from the inbox icon that you’ll see at the upper right corner of your feed. You can mention someone in a caption or a comment to get their attention, but that won’t make the post private. And you can post photos to your story, but while they’ll only be available temporarily, they’ll be visible to anybody who follows you or clicks onto your profile if your account is public.

7. If you find a photo that you like online, you can:

A. Repost or use it anyway you like on social media, without any consequences
B. Use it only if you seek permission from the copyright owner
C. Use it, but expect to see some content deleted thanks to copyright complaints

There’s nothing stopping you from using a photo you see online — except for the sticky issue of copyright. While you don’t actually have to request permission from the copyright holder each time you want to repost a cute photo, it’s possible that you’ll get in trouble for using photos without permission. On Pinterest, for instance, if your account gets too many copyright complaints, you might lose the ability to pin new content.

8. What’s the difference between talking to someone in a Hangout versus a FaceTime?

A. Hangouts is a Google app, and FaceTime is Apple’s video call platform
B. FaceTime is just for two people, while Hangouts is for bigger groups
C. Hangouts involve voice calls, while FaceTime involves video calls

While less tech-savvy people might use the terms “Hangout” and “FaceTime” interchangeably, they actually refer to two different platforms. Are messaging apps truly social networks? Not exactly. But the topic comes up in part because the current iteration of Google Hangouts evolved from a feature within Google+, Google’s social network.

Man smiling and holding his laptop

You can use Google Hangouts and Apple’s FaceTime to make video calls to friends | iStock.com

9. If your Facebook posts are set to private, who can see them?

A. Only your friends
B. Your friends and anyone that your friends share your posts with
C. Your friends and their friends, but the visibility stops there

It may be tempting to believe that anything you post on Facebook is going to stay safely within your circle of friends. But with just a few shares, a post can travel far beyond its intended audience and end up in front of hundreds, if not thousands, of people that you don’t know. Yet another reason to be careful about what you post online.

10. Other people can post photos of you:

A. That were taken when you were in public
B. That were taken at a private event or in a private home
C. That were taken anywhere, anytime

This question has led to some sticky legal cases. But when you’re using social media, a good rule to keep in mind is that it’s typically OK for somebody else to post a photo of you that was taken in public, or someplace where you wouldn’t have an expectation of privacy. Photos taken in a private home or at an event that you didn’t expect to be documented, on the other hand, are a shadier legal area.

11. #TBT stands for:

A. Throwback Thursday
B. Throwback Tuesday
C. It doesn’t stand for anything, but is a popular caption when posting an older photo

#TBT is a popular tag that you’ll see on Thursdays, when people post photos that were taken days, months, or even years earlier. There’s not much more to it than that — just make sure that the photos you choose are in good taste.

12. Snapchat Stories are:

A. The captions you post under your photos
B. The series of photos and videos that you share with all your Snapchat friends
C. The photos and videos that you exchange privately with friends

Your Snapchat Story is the series of photos and videos that you post for all of your Snapchat friends to see. The content you post will only stick around for 24 hours, but that’s plenty of time to curate a fun narrative and give people a glimpse of what you’re doing, whether it’s a pretty standard day or if you’re on a fun outing.

Man marking up a paper in a library

Snapchat is a fun way to document your day for your friends | iStock.com

13. The minimum age for making an account at Facebook is:

A. 13
B. 16
C. There’s no age minimum, just a box asking for parental consent

Technically, you need to be 13 or older to create an account on Facebook. Creating an account using false information is a violation of the social network’s terms of service (so don’t create an account on behalf of a too-young niece or nephew).

14. When confronted with government requests, most major social networks:

A. Won’t hand over your messages and data
B. Hand over your information if there’s a good reason to do so
C. Share your data without asking any questions

Social networks are receiving large numbers of government requests for information on users. While you might think that they’ll hand over your data without asking questions — or that they’ll refuse to hand over your data at all — the reality is that their response typically falls somewhere in the middle. Most social networks carefully consider requests to determine whether there’s a good reason to hand over your information. Just be aware that your data, your posts, and your messages may not be quite as private as you thought they were.

15. So you posted something negative about your employer or your workplace. Your boss can:

A. Fire you regardless of the kinds of comments you made
B. Terminate you or penalize you if there’s evidence that your comments were made with malicious intent
C. Your boss can’t do anything, regardless of the intent of your comments

This is a sticky question without a definitive answer. But the legal precedent seems to be that your employer may be able to terminate or penalize you if there’s proof that the comments you made are malicious or reckless. Legally, you should be able to post about your work online without losing your job, but we’d advise avoiding a sticky situation entirely and refraining from posting about your employer online.

16. If you’re a blogger or social media celeb and endorse a product you got for free, you:

A. Don’t have to disclose whether you were paid or received free items
B. Need to disclose the relationship, as per the Federal Trade Commission
C. Only need to disclose free products if you want to

Product and service reviews need to be honest and transparent. So if you’re a blogger or a social media celebrity who’s received something to review for free, or if you’re getting paid to feature a company, you’ll need to make that clear in your post.

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