Bizarre Medical Treatments That Work, But Can Be Deadly

Strange and unusual medical treatments can work. But there are certain risks involved with experimental treatments. Discover bizarre medical treatments that can be deadly, ahead.

Cryotherapy

Cryptotherapy is dangerous but increasingly popular. | Franck Fife/AFP/Getty Images

The most common form of Cryotherapy is the “application of ice or cold packs to injuries to cause blood vessels to constrict, which reduces blood flow and alleviates pain, swelling and inflammation,” according to Forbes. Today, people submerge themselves in a tank or stand in a room with extremely low temperatures. This process is known as Whole Body Cryotherapy. Some claim cryotherapy helps slow the aging process, aid in weight loss, and increase energy.

Hint: In seconds, a woman dies in a cryotherapy chamber.

Why cryotherapy may be dangerous

The human body wasn’t made to withstand these kinds of temperatures. | Franck Fife/AFP/Getty Images

A cryotherapy spa employee dies in 2015 after suffocating in a cryotherapy chamber. Her death is ruled an accident, according to The New York Times. This tragic accident highlights the possible dangers of cryotherapy. You don’t know what can happen in the chamber. In addition, there isn’t much scientific research to substantiate the benefits of cryotherapy. For now, stick to taking a cold shower.

Hint: Leech saliva helps the human body.

Leech therapy

Leeches are being used in medicine again. | Sam Panthaky/AFP/Getty Images

Leech therapy is a practice dating back to ancient Egypt, according to Healthline. “Leeches secrete peptides and proteins that work to prevent blood clots. […] This keeps blood flowing to wounds to help them heal.”

Hint: You may be allergic to leech saliva.

Why leech therapy may be dangerous

Leeches are still a risky treatment. | Tauseef Mustafa/AFP/Getty Images

Leech therapy is becoming more widely accepted in treating heart disease and even cancer. However, the process isn’t risk-free. There’s a chance a patient may be allergic to leech saliva. There’s also a chance of contracting a bacterial infection.

Hint: You’ll never think of a bath the same way again.

Beer spa

Inclined Glass of beer

For when drinking beer just isn’t enough. | photologica/Getty Images

Take a bath in a tub filled with beer at a beer spa. They’re gaining popularity in the Czech Republic and elsewhere in Europe, according to Momtastic. While the idea sounds fun and a little out there, there may be benefits to soaking in beer. “A bath of beer is billed as detoxifying, and supposedly improves blood circulation and cleanses the pores,” according to Food and Wine.

Hint: Soaking in a beer bath may cause dizziness.

Why a beer spa may be dangerous

Claw foot bath tub in olive green bathroom

Alcohol can make you dehydrated. | ToscaWhi/iStock/Getty Images

Dizziness may occur for those imbibing too much during a beer bath. The spas are known to give guests free beer while soaking so take it easy on the brews. Alcohol causes the body to dehydrate and so does sitting in hot water — or beer for that matter– according to Olympic Hot Tub.

Ozone anti-aging

Hospital nurse helps a senior woman breath through an oxygen mask

Could this be the latest trend in medicine? | lisafx/ Getty Images

Among believers, ozone therapy is the “cure for cancer, AIDS and virtually all other ails,” according to Momtastic. Produced from medical grade oxygen, ozone gas is administered through various methods including injections and saunas. Supposedly, there are anti-aging benefits as well.

Hint: A government agency says ozone gas is harmful.

Why ozone anti-aging therapy may be dangerous

Inhaler

Ozone could cause serious side effects. | Martin Barraud/ OJO Images/ Getty Images

According to the EPA, ozone gas can be very harmful to the body. “Relatively low amounts can cause chest pain, coughing, shortness of breath and throat irritation.” The gas may even worsen a person’s ability to fight respiratory infections.

Check out The Cheat Sheet on Facebook!

Read more: Alternative Medicine: What to Know About the Growing Industry