You’re More Likely to Develop Heart Disease If You Live in This U.S. State

Heart disease is the leading cause of death among both men and women in the United States. Many of its risk factors, like high blood pressure, may be preventable. Surprisingly, where you live also speaks to your likelihood of developing the chronic disease.

If you’re interested in reducing your risk, there’s a lot you can do. You might first want to look at the states with the highest heart disease rates (just wait till you see what state came in at No. 1).

7. West Virginia

charleston, west virginia

West Virginia has the highest rate of heart disease. | Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Nearly 5,000 people died of heart disease in 2015.

As of 2015, about 7.4% of adults in the state of West Virginia reported they’d been told they had heart disease or angina. In 2010, it was the No. 1 killer in the state. It accounted for approximately 23% of all deaths among West Virginia residents that year.

6. Mississippi

Welcome to Mississippi

A lot of Mississippi residents have died of heart disease. | Meinzahn/iStock/Getty Images

Almost 8,000 people died of the disease in Mississippi in 2015.

As of 2015, about 4.9% of adults in the state of Mississippi reported they’d been told they had heart disease or angina. In 2010, it was the No. 1 killer in the state. It accounted for about 26% of all deaths among Mississippi residents that year.

5. Kentucky

Louisville, KY

Over 10,000 people died of heart disease in 2015. | toddtaulman/iStock/Getty Images

Just over 10,000 people died of the disease in 2015.

As of 2015, about 6% of adults in the state of Kentucky reported they’d been told they had heart disease or angina. In 2013, it was the No. 2 killer in the state. It accounted for about 23% of all deaths among Kentucky residents that year.

4. Oklahoma

Oklahoma City area on a map

Heart disease accounted for 26% of Oklahoma resident’s deaths in 2010. | iStock.com/Manakin

Just over 10,000 people died as a result of heart disease in Oklahoma in 2015.

As of 2015, about 5.1% of adults in the state of Oklahoma reported they’d been told they had heart disease or angina. In 2010, it was the No. 1 killer in the state. It accounted for about 26% of all deaths among Oklahoma residents that year.

3. Louisiana

St-Johns Cathedral - Lafayette, Louisiana

Heart disease was the no. 1 killer in Louisiana in 2010. | artiste9999/iStock / Getty Images Plus

Almost 11,000 people died of the disease in Louisiana in 2015.

As of 2015, about 5.3% of adults in the state of Louisiana reported they’d been told they had heart disease or angina. In 2010, it was the No. 1 killer in the state. It accounted for about 25% of all deaths among Louisiana residents that year.

2. Alabama

Welcome to Alabama road sign on US-84 near Gordon

Alabama has it’s share of heart disease problems. | iStock.com/miroslav_1

Almost 13,000 people died as a result of heart disease in Alabama in 2015.

As of 2015, about 5.3% of adults in the state of Alabama reported they’d been told they had heart disease or angina. In 2014, it was the No. 1 killer in the state. It accounted for about 25% of all deaths among Alabama residents that year.

1. Tennessee

downtown Nashville, Tennessee

Heart disease was the no. 1 killer in Tennessee in 2013. | Sean Pavone/iStock/Getty Images

Almost 16,000 people died as a result of heart disease in Tennessee in 2015.

As of 2015, about 4.9% of adults in the state of Tennessee reported they’d been told they had heart disease or angina. Angina describes the chest pain or discomfort that’s often a sign of forthcoming heart problems. In 2013, it was the No. 1 killer in the state. It accounted for about 23% of all deaths among Tennessee residents that year.

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