Should You Really Work Out With Your Partner? The Answer May Surprise You

Have you ever tried working out with your partner? Dragging your significant other to the gym — or letting them coax you into joining them there — doesn’t just make both of you healthier. It can also improve your relationship. Here’s why your workout routine needs something a little extra.

A little competition benefits you both

man performing a plank on a blue exercise mat as a woman times him

A little friendly competition will be good for your relationship. | iStock.com

Are you naturally a competitive person? Is your significant other? This might lead to some clashes, but not always. Adding this element to your relationship — and your workouts — might actually lead to a more honest, open, and supportive partnership.

If you’re working out next to your partner, for example, and you notice they’re doing a move wrong, you’re probably going to tell them so. You might also apply this practice outside the gym.

You’ll be happier together

man running on the beach on a sunny day

Working out raises your mood overall. | iStock.com

Even when you’re doing it alone, physical activity can boost your mood and improve your relationship. Fitness triggers the release of hormones called endorphins, your body’s natural painkillers that help relieve stress and increase feelings of happiness.

The mood and confidence boosts you’ll both experience after a good workout can also benefit your relationship in the long-term, setting you up for a much happier life together.

They’re your built-in accountability buddy

happy people doing lunge exercise in gym

Your partner can help keep you accountable. | iStock.com/dolgachov

You’re much more likely to stick to your fitness routine when you have someone by your side to give you the push you need.

A significant other can act as a built-in support system just by agreeing to go to the gym with you regularly. You might need that kind of accountability to get out of bed for your morning workout when you’d rather get an extra hour of sleep.

You’ll grow closer emotionally

Woman hiking

A little workout can bring you and your partner closer together. | iStock.com

People who work out with a partner are more likely to experience a deeper emotional bond with that person as a result.

Working out next to one another, you might lift weights in unison or match your footfalls to your partner’s automatically. Researchers have found that people feel more emotionally connected and attracted to one another even when unknowingly mimicking one another.

You’ll have a better sex life

Couple kissing in bed

Who doesn’t want a better sex life? | Puhhha/iStock/Getty Images

Working out together benefits the both of you both in body and in mind. This isn’t just help you get along better — it might also improve your sex life.

There are a few possible physical and psychological reasons for this. Physically, exercise improves blood flow and mimics feelings of arousal. Psychologically, people who work out regularly tend to have a more positive body image, which might even make those intimate moments more enjoyable.

You’ll actually achieve your fitness goals

Bearded man in shorts and gray tee shirt

You’ll look better and feel better. | iStock.com/UberImages

Social support boosts your likelihood of sticking to your fitness regimen, but that’s not the only reason a built-in workout partner can help you reach your goals.

Your normal excuses for skipping your workouts lose their merit when you both have blocked out time in your schedules to work out together. Plus, your significant other cares about you, and wants you to do well. They’re less likely to hesitate to push you closer to success.

You might eat better, too

Healthy Lifestyle Diet

Your diet will improve. | iStock.com/Rawpixel Ltd

Research has sown that including your significant other in lifestyle changes can have a positive impact on your health behaviors. This isn’t just limited to exercise, though.

If you’re already working out together, it’s likely you’re also eating at least some meals together. It wouldn’t hurt to make a joint commitment to improve your diets, especially if you’re living together and taking turns doing the shopping or meal prep.

Follow The Cheat Sheet on Facebook!

More Articles About:   , ,