The Scary and Easy Way Kids Are ‘Juuling’ at School and What You Can Do About It

Teen cigarette smoking rates are on the decline, but has something replaced old fashioned smoking in U.S. middle and high schools? Frightening data by the U.S. Department of Health and Human services found electronic or e-cigarette usage jumped for middle school and high school students in the last few years, Today reports.

High school rates are dramatically high as 37.7% of teens report using e-cigarettes. One especially disturbing trend is an e-cigarette called “Juuling,” which is becoming so concerning, parents and the schools are taking action. Page 5 shows the terrifying reason why this is so popular.

1. Juuling is the same as vaping, but with this difference

A Juul | Juul Labs

Juuling falls under the same e-cigarette category as vaping, however, what distinguishes a Juul is the device resembles a thumb drive, according to The New York Times. It also emits a very slight amount of vapor, which makes it easy to consume in a school setting or even in class.

Next: But isn’t vaping safe?

2. This is what vaping can do to your body

Any way you look at it, vaping is not good for you. |  Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Teens tell their parents e-cigarettes or vaping is harmless, but research shows this could not be further from the truth. Most e-cigarettes actually contain nicotine and the aerosol in the e-cigarette may lead to lung inflammation, according to NBC News. Also, while e-cigarettes may contain less harmful chemicals, vaping likely has cancer-causing elements, according to the Centers for Disease Control.

E-cigarette batteries are also potentially dangerous, as they’ve been known to explode.

Next: This is what makes Juuling so powerful.

3. Is Juuling addictive?

These products are clearly being marketed to kids. | Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

In addition to being offered in delicious flavors like mango and crème brulee, one Juul cartridge contains the same amount of nicotine as a pack of cigarettes, according to Center on Addiction. Nicotine is known to be highly addictive, which hooks the teen into a vicious cycle of Juuling.

Next: Here’s one reason parents are worried.

4. This is how easy Juuls are to purchase

courier delivers an Amazon package to a costumer

Kids can easily buy a Juul on Amazon.| nito100/Getty Images

Some high school Juuling dealers post on social media what they have, how much kids should pay and where to purchase the devices, The New Yorker reports. One teen told The New Yorker that kids will boldly lineup to purchase Juuls in school locker rooms and bathrooms.

Teens are often able to purchase Juuls using prepaid debit cards on Ebay and Amazon, according to The New Yorker. The legal age to buy a Juul is 21, Today reports.

Next: Why are some kids hooked?

5. This is the reason why teens love it

Young woman using smart phone

Vaping is incredibly popular on social media. | iStock.com/Poike

Juuling provides an easy way to calm nerves or even manage boredom, according to The New Yorker. Plus there’s an element of social media FOMO as more kids like to post Juuling images.

“You’re expected to Juul, but you’re expected to not depend on it,” one teen told The New Yorker. “If you’re cool, then you Juul with other people, and you post about it, so everyone will see that you’re social and ironic and funny.”

Next: This is what this school district did to reduce the problem.

6. Schools recognize this as an issue

This issue is affecting countless schools. | Monkeybusinessimages/iStock/Getty Images

A school district in Pennsylvania banned flash drives in school to cut down on Juuls, Today reports. One school even removed bathroom doors to avoid teens from Juuling in school restrooms.

Next: What can parents do?

7. This is what you can do

budget, family members

Talk to your kids about the dangers of Juuling. | iStock.com

Parents should talk to their teens about Juuling, according to Today. Ask if your kids know about Juuling and let them know it contains nicotine. Let them know e-cigarettes are not safe, because they contain dangerous, addictive chemicals. Remember, the device looks like a thumb drive so inspect anything resembling one in your child’s possession.

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