These People Got Revenge By Building ‘Spite Houses’ With the Goal of Pissing People Off

When it comes down to it, people are pretty petty. They do some perfectly legal and non-threatening things with the sole intention of pissing off their neighbors. Some people take that whole concept and bring it to a new level when they build monuments to their pettiness.

Those monuments are called “Spite Houses” and they are nothing short of hilarious. Check out these amazing structures and the lengths some neighbors went to to get revenge. No. 8 is our personal favorite, but No. 10 will melt your heart.

1. The Plum Island Pink House

The Pink House.

Things didn’t go as planned for the ex-wife. | Alison Odle/Save The Pink House

Divorce can bring out the worst in people and settlements of those divorces can be pretty hefty. One such divorce ended with the ex-wife demanding that her former husband built an exact replica of the house they lived in. As the story goes, he obliged.

Just one problem: She never specified where. The ex-husband built the house in a desolate area in the middle of a salt marsh. The house also didn’t come with any fresh running water and has lead paint, asbestos, and radon. They likely didn’t know about the dangers of those last few things in 1925, so we can just call it an added bonus of spite.

Next: This next house is a perfect example of “two for one.”

 2. The Alameda Spite House

The Alameda Spite House.

He definitely got his revenge. | Lisle Boomer via Flickr

The San Francisco Bay area is known for it’s densely packed population. Having so many people stacked on top of one another can cause some serious feuds … especially when your neighbor plots with the city to build a street through your property.

That’s what happened when the City of Alameda took a rather large chunk of land from Charles Froling. With what Froling was left with, he decided to exact his revenge. With a plot of 10 feet by 54 feet, Froling built a two-story home that butted up against all four corners of the land. Not only is it an eyesore for the neighborhood, but it also blocks out any sunlight for the neighbors.

Next: When your investment property fires back at you. 

3. The O’Reilly Spite House

A woman standing at the O'Reilly spite house.

Folks love stopping by this location. | MKSbella via Instagram

Francis O’Reilly bought an investment parcel of land in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The purpose of it was to gain equity for which he could later sell for more money. Essentially, a piece of a retirement plan. However, the parcel he owned was very small.

When the neighbor to his property refused to buy the small parcel to add to their own, O’Reilly did the only thing that seemed reasonable: He built a spite house. The house reaches a max width of eight feet wide and still stands today. Ironically or appropriately enough, it became the office for an interior decorating firm.

Next: Some spite houses are completely justified and serve a great purpose.

4. The Equality House

The Equality House across from the church.

A great way to fight back against hate. | Mochimonstermai via Instagram

Being petty towards intolerance and inequity is always highly encouraged. America still has a long way to go on both of these fronts, but people like this are the ones who carry the torch forward. One of the groups that oppose that march into the future is the Westboro Baptist Church.

Thankfully, a family in Topeka, Kansas who live right across the street from the hate group, take a strong spiteful stance against the so-called church’s intolerant views. The house is painted in the colors of the pride flag and acts as a resource center for all Planting Peace human rights initiatives. Every day, the house receives 150 visitors and everyone is welcome to visit the property.

Next: Talk about a protest for all to see!

5. The Purple House

Complaint to Neighbor document

The Purple House no longer exists. | Designer491/Getty Images

This house just reminds us of the Beastie Boys hit single fight for your right. The tenants of this house were targeted by their neighbors and the city for having too many unrelated people living in the home at once. In addition, they also received various noise complaints and parking infractions. The former seems like a pretty petty citation, so what were they to do?

Well, the people living in the home decided to paint their house bright purple. They also added smiling faces and mouse ears. Naturally, this house became an eyesore for everyone around. If you are wanting to see this house in person, you won’t get a retinal shot of lavender anymore. The house has been returned to its original color due to the people settling with the city out of court.

Next: We like pie as much as the next person, but why would you build a house shaped like it?

6. The Montlake Pie House

A cardboard figure of a couple being cut.

A bitter divorce led to a very popular spite house. | Designer491/iStock/Getty Images

This house has a couple of legends about its reason for existing. The favorite is a dispute between a divorcing couple and the measly plot of land left to the ex-wife by the husband. Another is that the owner of the land was offered such an embarrassingly low amount of money for the land, that they built a spite house on it.

Either way, the Pie House in Seattle, Washington is actually quite desirable. The house 15 feet wide at one end and tapers down to just four feet at the other end, covering just about 850 square feet. The house sold in 2016 for half a million dollars. We imagine that with Seattle’s ridiculous housing market it will be worth a cool million by 2020.

Next: We can’t emphasize this enough: Don’t move in next to your enemies.

7. The Nevada Spite House

The Nevada spite house.

A petty way to deal with your rivals. | Sylvia Singleton via Pinterest

The question of this legend is why on Earth would you ever want to move next to your nemesis? That’s apparently what happened when a miner in Virginia City, Nevada finally built his dream home.

Apparently, his enemy plotted against him and bought the plot of land right next to him. Then had his own house moved on to the land and butted it right up against the others house. you have to have a serious hatred for a person to go through that much trouble just to mess with a person.

Next: There are family feuds, and then there are these brothers who brought it to a new level.

8. The Skinny House

A tourist in front of the Skinny House.

Tourists love checking out this popular spite house. | Jeffhowarddc via Instagram

Brotherly love is reserved for other people and not these two Boston natives. Two brothers received a rather large plot of land from their father after he passed away during the Civil War. One of the brothers was away, serving in the military and the other stayed and built his dream home.

When the brother who served returned, he found only a small sliver of land left for him. His response wasn’t to get his fair share but to get even in his own way. He built a house directly next to his brothers that blocked out any natural light. Back then, that natural light was essential since electricity was available. At it’s greatest width, the house is just 10-feet-wide.

Next: Somebody took “thin to win” a little too seriously when they planned their revenge.

9. The Richardson Spite House

The spite house in a black and white photo.

The two couldn’t come to an agreement. | M0tty via Wikicommons

At the end of the 19th century, a few thousand dollars was a huge deal. In 1882, Hyman Sarner wanted to use the land he owned to build an apartment building. He owned most of the lots on 43rd and Lexington in New York except for one. The final lot was owned by Joseph Richardson.

Hyman offered to buy the plot of land for $1,000, but Richardson felt his plot was worth five times that. Neither were able to reach an agreement and Hyman went ahead and built his property. Richardson did the only thing he could do to get back at him. He built a five-foot-wide structure all along Lexington. Don’t expect to see this structure, as it was demolished in the 1920’s.

Next: Many believe this house inspired an instant cult classic in 2009. 

10. The ‘Up’ house

The Macefeild house seen from across the street.

The house is a success story. | RickMcKinleypdx/Getty Images

Edith Macefeild wanted one thing with her life: To live it out in her home in Ballard, Washington. The last thing she wanted was to live out her days in a nursing home and she got her way. Macefield was offered $1 million for her home so that an apartment building could be constructed on her block. She didn’t want it.

The company that wanted to build the apartments already had the land surrounding her and they needed to move forward with their investment. So they built the entire apartment around Edith’s house. Pixar claims that Edith’s home was not the inspiration for their movie Up. It did, however, garner that name after the release of the movie in 2009.

Check out The Cheat Sheet on Facebook!

 

More Articles About:   , ,  

More from The Cheat Sheet