5 Ways Even the Busiest People Can Find the Time to Work Out

Do you always have an excuse for not hitting the gym? Are you that person who says every day, “I’m going to go to the gym tomorrow,” but never ends up going? Do you try and fail to find an hour to go work out or just simply blow it off? If you are a busy person, it is possible to find time for fitness, as long as you have a plan. Whether you are an executive of a large corporation or work from home, here are five ways to find time to work out. 

1. Class it up

fitness class stepping onto benches with dumbbells

Scheduling a fitness class is a good way to hold you accountable. | iStock.com

Classes are a great way to get fit for so many reasons. They also provide an incentive. Most large gyms and studios require you to sign up in advance, and many penalize you for flaking out. While this might sound annoying and unfair, try to think of it as a great source of motivation instead. Furthermore, by setting a time to do something, making a plan, and putting it on your calendar, you are more likely to do it instead of simply saying you’ll go to the gym after work.

2. Lunch hour: It isn’t just for lunch anymore

Some spin classes are short enough to squeeze in during lunch | iStock.com

Some spin classes are short enough to squeeze in during lunch. | iStock.com

Most people have an hour in the middle of the day to leave the office and go to the gym. If your regular gym isn’t near your office, join one that is, or pay for a la carte classes at a boutique studio. Perhaps it’s time to consider belonging to a different gym with more locations. Or join a second gym like Planet Fitness, which only costs $10 per month or approximately the price of two lattes. It has over 1,000 locations, so there is probably one close to your office. It is not fancy, but if you want to use the elliptical during your lunch hour, Planet Fitness has plenty of those.

If you don’t want to get too sweaty (it’s OK, we won’t judge), take a yoga, barre, or Pilates class during that time instead. These classes are effective, but you won’t come back and stink up your cubicle.

If you need to budget your time strictly, lots of gyms offer lunchtime express classes that are more intense, but for a shorter period of time. Boutique chain Fly Wheel has some of the best spin classes available, and most are only 45 minutes long.

3. Hire a trainer

Source: iStock

Working with a trainer means you’ll make time. | iStock.com

Much like taking classes, trainers will hold you accountable, but to an even greater extent. You have an appointment, someone else will be there, and if you don’t show up, you’re going to have to pay for it anyway. Trainers also don’t come cheap, so you probably won’t miss your workout if know you paid a lot of money for it. And you will really annoy someone who is a whole lot stronger than you are. The other benefit of having a trainer is that you will work harder than you would on your own, and your routine will be tailored to your needs and goals specifically.

4. Bring a plus-one

You can combine social time with exercise | iStock.com

You can combine social time with exercise. | iStock.com

Find a friend, and go at it together. Make plans, and hold each other accountable. Take a class you’d never do on your own, with another person. Or run next to each other on the treadmill or even outside. Take a hike. Spot each other doing bench presses. Working out is also a really fun activity for couples to do together. Instead of dinner and a movie on Friday night, go to yoga and a favorite health food restaurant instead.

5. Turn your commute into your gym

Your commute can double as your workout | iStock.com

Your commute can double as your workout. | iStock.com

If you are chained to your desk leave or have evening commitments like kids, why not turn your daily commute into your daily workout? Biking or walking to work burns calories and saves cash. Plus, it’s eco-friendly. There’s no better way to win by multitasking, and the prize is being in better shape.

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