5 Hidden Beaches You Need to Find

Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/lam_chihang/

Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/lam_chihang/

Sometimes you just want — or need — to get away, and a crowded beach just won’t cut it. Whether you’re looking for a romantic locale or a remote stretch of sand to listen to the waves roll in, these five beaches won’t disappoint.

1. Palm Beach, Barbuda

Located on the twin island nation of Antigua and Barbuda, Palm Beach stretches 13 miles on the smaller island of Barbuda. A 20 minute flight or 3 hour boat ride from Antigua, Barbuda has less inhabited beaches than the more than 365 Antigua boasts. Palm Beach is the real gem of the twin islands, as it is only accessible by boat, according to AntiguaNice’s guide to the island. The small cove has strechtes of white and pink sand and offers snorkeling and sun bathing without an audience.

Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/xoque/

Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/xoque/

2. Kaihalulu Red Sand Beach, Maui, Hawaii

Hawaii is famous for it’s black sand beaches, and tourists flock to see the rare sand. Brave the short hike to get to this spot and you’ll be rewarded with the beach (mostly) to yourself. Plus, the color contrast of red sand and blue water is not to be missed. Be careful, though — To-Hawaii’s guide to the island warns that Kaihalulu means “strong current,” so swimming and watersports are not advised. Instead, snap photos of the unique red sand and give yourself a pat on the back for completing the hike to get there.

Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/danielantunes/

Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/danielantunes/

3. Figueira Beach, Algarve, Portugal

Europeans are regulars in Portugal’s infamous beach region, but the town of Salema still remains relatively undiscovered. Figueira Beach means fig tree in Portugeuse, aptly named for it’s position at the end of a valley of fig trees, according to the town of Salema. Visit Figueira Beach at low tide and scramble over the rocks to reach the sand, but be warned: once high tide hits, you’ll have to take the land route back to town.

Source: Wikipedia

4. El Roble, Puerto Carrillo, Costa Rica

While Puerto Carrillo’s main beach is far from crowded, venture to El Roble for small tide pools and a waterfall. This beach is rockier than the others on the list, so be prepared to spend your day soaking in one of the tidal pools. If you’re looking for a more traaditional sandy beach in the region, head to Playa El Sur. Villa Oasis says this beach is surrounded by palm trees and only accessible by boat, so it has the privacy you may be looking for.

Source: Thinkstock

Source: Thinkstock

5. Cala Soraya, Sardinia, Italy

Calling the uninhabited island of Spargi home, Cala Soraya is lined by pistachio shrubs and sees very little foot traffic. Recommended by Condé Nast, this beach is also only accessible by boat and may see the least number of visitors of all of the beaches on the list. The island of Spargi is off the coast of Italy in the Maddalena archipelago and one of the Mediterranean’s little known treasures. If you’re feeling adventurous, sail to one of the other islands in the archipelago, noteably Santa Maria has a bar-restaurant unlike the other islands.

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