7 Recipes Bringing International Street Food Home

Street food transcends cultures, with just about every country having vendors in their cities catering to citizens and tourists on the go. But don’t let these international food sellers hog all the glory. It won’t be exactly the same, but you can get street-styled eats at home with one of these 7 recipes.

Source: iStock

Source: iStock

1. Currywurst

Pork sausage is chopped, then covered in a curry and ketchup sauce to create currywurst, a hugely popular street food in Germany Fodors explains. Pick up knockwursts at the grocery store, and top them off with the currywurst sauce from Saveur, which yields 1½ cups of sauce.

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons canola oil
  • 1 large yellow onion, finely chopped.
  • 2 tablespoons curry powder
  • 1 tablespoon hot paprika
  • 2 cups whole peeled canned tomatoes, crushed with juice
  • ½ cup white sugar
  • ¼ cup red wine vinegar
  • Salt, to taste

Directions: Heat canola oil in a saucepan over medium heat. Add onion and cook until soft, 8–10 minutes. Add curry powder and hot paprika; cook for 1 minute more. Using hands, crush 2 cups whole peeled canned tomatoes (with juice) into pan. Add sugar, red wine vinegar, and salt to taste; stir well. Increase heat to high; bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer, stirring occasionally, until thickened, about 25 minutes. Purée sauce in a blender until smooth. Strain sauce through a sieve. Serve hot over sausage.

Source: iStock

Source: iStock

2. Bánh Mì

Vietnam has so many options when it comes to bánh mì that The Wall Street Journal‘s Robyn Eckhardt took to the streets to find a few standout locations. A sandwich with serious French flair, bánh mì splits a baguette, filling it with meats, cheeses, sauces, and the occasional pâtéCooking Light has skipped the pate in its Vietnamese-inspired sandwiches.

Ingredients:

  • ½ cup shredded carrot
  • ½ cup grated peeled daikon radish
  • 1 tablespoon cider vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 3 tablespoons chili garlic sauce (such as Lee Kum Kee)
  • 1½ teaspoons sugar
  • 1 (1-pound) pork tenderloin, trimmed
  • Cooking spray
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 3 tablespoons fat-free mayonnaise
  • 2 (20-inch) baguettes (about 8½ ounces each)
  • 16 thin cucumber slices (about 1 cucumber)
  • 16 cilantro sprigs
  • ¼ cup thinly sliced green onions (about 2)
  • 1 seeded and thinly sliced jalapeño pepper

Directions: Combine the first 5 ingredients; cover and let stand 15 minutes to 1 hour. Drain. Preheat oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Combine the chili garlic sauce and 1½ teaspoons sugar; stir well. Place pork on the rack of a small roasting pan or broiler pan coated with cooking spray. Spread 2 tablespoons chili garlic mixture evenly over pork; sprinkle the pork with ½ teaspoon salt. Bake at 400 degrees Fahrenheit for 20 minutes or until a thermometer registers 155 degrees Fahrenheit (slightly pink.) Cool; cover the pork, and refrigerate.

Combine mayonnaise and remaining chili garlic sauce mixture; cover and refrigerate. Cut each baguette horizontally, cutting to, but not through, other side using a serrated knife. Spread mayonnaise mixture evenly on cut sides of baguettes. Thinly slice pork; divide pork evenly between baguettes. Top evenly with carrot mixture. Arrange 8 cucumber slices and 8 cilantro sprigs on each baguette. Top evenly with onions and jalapeño. Press top gently to close; cut each baguette into 4 equal servings.

Source: iStock

Source: iStock

3. Shawarma 

“Shawarma is the Arabic fast-food. The original shawarma recipe is Turkish and known as the Iskandar shawarma,” Chef Ahmad Salaibi, Head Chef of the Automatic Restaurant at the Beach Centre in Jumeirah explained to Gulf News. It may be Turkish in origin, but the slow roasted, marinated meats have caught on around the world. Since you probably don’t have a rotisserie spit to roast your meats, use the recipe from Men’s Health to grill chicken, flavored with a shawarma-style marinade on pita bread.

Ingredients:

  • 1½ pounds boneless, skinless chicken thighs
  • 2 cups Greek yogurt
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • ½ teaspoon dried oregano
  • juice of 1 lemon
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • ½ English cucumber, minced
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • ½ tablespoon red-wine vinegar
  • 4 whole-wheat pitas

Directions: Combine the chicken with half the yogurt and two-thirds of the minced garlic, along with the cumin, oregano, and lemon juice. Add a few pinches of salt and pepper, toss, and marinate in the refrigerator for at least 2 hours, or up to 8.

Heat a grill or grill pan on high while you mix the remaining yogurt and garlic with the cucumber, olive oil, and vinegar. Add salt to taste and set the sauce aside.

Grill the thighs until they’re lightly charred on both sides and cooked through, about 8 minutes total. Let them rest off the heat for 5 minutes; meanwhile, lightly toast the pitas on the grill. Slice the chicken into strips and stuff them into the pitas; add the yogurt sauce and your choice of toppings.

Source: iStock

Source: iStock

4. Piadina With Ricotta, Prosciutto, and Arugula

When it comes to Italian street food, piadinas are a must. The piadina, a flatbread, is combined with any number of fillings when ordered on the streets of Emilia-Romagna, Food & Wine explains. In Paul Bartolotta’s at-home version ricotta, prosciutto, and arugula were the fillings of choice for creating what Bartolotta calls fresh food fast.

Ingredients:

  • 3½ cups all-purpose flour
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • Kosher salt
  • 4 ounces lard or vegetable shortening (½ cup), at room temperature
  • ¾ cup water
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for brushing
  • 1½ cups fresh ricotta cheese
  • Freshly ground pepper
  • 4 ounces baby arugula (4 cups)
  • 1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
  • ¼ pound thinly sliced prosciutto, mortadella or salami

Directions: In a standing electric mixer fitted with the dough hook, combine the flour, baking soda, and 2 teaspoons of salt. Add the lard and mix at medium-low speed until evenly combined. Slowly add the water, mixing until the dough forms a mass around the hook. Increase the speed to medium and knead until smooth, 5 minutes. Divide the dough into 6 pieces and roll each piece into a ball. Wrap the balls in plastic and let rest at room temperature for 30 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 225 degrees Fahrenheit. Heat a cast-iron griddle until very hot. On an unfloured work surface, roll out each ball to a 10-inch round, about ⅛-inch thick. Brush both sides of each round very lightly with oil and grill over moderate heat, turning once, until golden and cooked through, 3 to 4 minutes. Wrap in foil and keep the breads warm in the oven while you cook the rest.

In a small bowl, season the ricotta lightly with salt and pepper. In a medium bowl, toss the arugula with the 1 tablespoon of oil and the lemon juice and season with salt and pepper. Arrange 3 breads on a work surface and spread with the ricotta. Top with the prosciutto, followed by the arugula salad. Cover with the remaining breads, cut into quarters, and serve warm.

Source: Thinkstock

Source: Thinkstock

5. Elote

Across Mexico, street vendors have elote for sale. The Chicago Tribune notes that this flavorful, hot snack also appears U.S. streets in communities with strong ties to Mexico. Grill AllRecipes.com‘s elote and see how addicting grilled corn with cotija can be. To spice it up, add cayenne pepper or chili powder to the melted butter.

Ingredients:

  • 4 ears corn, shucked
  • ¼ cup melted butter
  • ¼ cup mayonnaise
  • ½ cup grated cotija cheese
  • 4 wedges lime

Directions: Preheat an outdoor grill for medium-high heat. Grill corn until hot and lightly charred all over, 7 to 10 minutes, depending on the temperature of the grill. Roll the ears in melted butter, then spread evenly with mayonnaise. Sprinkle with cotija cheese and serve with a lime wedge.

Source: Thinkstock

Source: Thinkstock

6. Fish and Chips

Fish and chips isn’t just a well-known British street food, the dish is an iconic offering throughout the country, on the streets, at pubs, and in high-end restaurants. The BBC referred to them as an “institution” when tracing the origins all the way back to the 1800s. To make it in your American kitchen, follow Tyler Florence’s Food Network recipe for English-style fish and chips.

Ingredients:

  • Vegetable oil, for deep frying
  • 4 large russet potatoes
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt, plus more for seasoning
  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, plus more for seasoning
  • 1 large egg, lightly beaten
  • 1 (12-ounce) can soda water
  • ½ cup rice flour, for dredging
  • 2 (8-ounce) cod or haddock fillets, cut in 1/2 on an angle
  • Malt vinegar, for serving

Tartar Sauce

  • 1 cup mayonnaise
  • 1 tablespoon chopped capers
  • 1 tablespoon chopped cornichons
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped flat-leaf parsley leaves
  • ½ lemon, juiced
  • Dash hot sauce

Directions: Heat 3-inches of the oil in a deep fryer to 325 degrees Fahrenheit. Alternately, heat 3-inches of oil in a deep pot. Peel the potatoes and cut them into chips, about the size of your index finger. Put the potatoes in the oil. Fry the chips for 2 to 3 minutes; they should not be crisp or fully cooked at this point. Remove the chips with a spider strainer or slotted spoon, to a paper towel-lined platter to drain.

Raise the oil temperature up to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. In a large mixing bowl, combine the flour, baking powder, salt, pepper, and egg. Pour in the soda water and whisk to a smooth batter. Spread the rice flour on a plate. Dredge the fish pieces in the rice flour and then dip them into the batter, letting the excess drip off.

Put the chips in the bottom of the fryer basket and carefully submerge in the hot oil. Carefully wave the battered fish into the bubbling oil before dropping them in on top of the chips. Fry the fish and chips for 4 to 5 minutes until crispy and brown. Remove the basket and drain the fish and chips on paper towels; season lightly with salt. Serve wrapped in a newspaper cone with malt vinegar and/or tartar sauce.

For the tartar sauce, in a small mixing bowl, combine all ingredients. Chill before serving to let the flavors marry.

Source: iStock

Source: iStock

7. Liege Waffles

Be like the Belgians and eat waffles for an afternoon snack. National Geographic says that at midday, people in Belgium purchase their waffles from the street, liberally garnished with strawberries and whipped cream. The liege waffles are yeasted, and made with pearl sugar, like this Food.com recipe. If pearl sugar is not available, use coarsely crushed sugar cubes instead. Top as desired.

Ingredients:

  • 1 (1/4 ounce) package yeast
  • ⅓ cup lukewarm water
  • 1½ tablespoons granulated sugar
  • ⅛ teaspoon salt
  • 2 cups flour
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 cup softened butter
  • 1 cup pearl sugar

Directions: Mix yeast, water, sugar and salt, and let develop for 15 minutes. Place flour into a large bowl. Make a well, pour in yeast mixture, and begin to knead. Continue to knead, add eggs, one at a time, and add soft butter, 2 tablespoons each addition, mixing well. Let dough rest in bowl until doubled. Gently mix in pearl sugar. Let rest for 15 minutes.

Heat waffle iron. When hot, butter waffle iron, pour in 3 tablespoons dough per waffle. Cook for 3-5 minutes, until waffles lightly brown on top. Serve warm or room temperature. Enjoy!

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