Streaming Fitness: 4 Reasons to Consider This Gym Alternative

Hitting the gym is a regular part of the day for most men. It’s home to all sorts of equipment that get your heart pumping and strengthen your muscles, which is key to living your healthiest life. They can be sort of a drain, though. MarketWatch reported the average cost of a membership is around $41 a month, but they’re typically no-frills clubs. It’s not unusual to shell out around $200 every month for a gym that you really like. Paying those fees, commuting, and fighting to find an open set of weights might make you question whether there’s a better way. It might be time to take a more futuristic approach to exercise.

You probably remember workout videos from the 1980s, and maybe even watched one for a few laughs. That idea has gotten an update with new streaming services geared toward today’s busy consumer. And they’re not just for spandex-clad ladies looking to do some step aerobics. One one new example is Peloton, a bicycle streaming service that goes along with the purchase of a tablet-equipped bike. Upstart Business Journal predicted this particular fitness class will be one of the biggest trends for 2015. They’re just one of many embracing the possibility of reaching fitness fiends online. With plenty of different options to choose from, you might find your gym membership is starting to seem a bit lacking. We’ve highlighted four of the most important benefits of opting for a streaming class to help you decide if it’s your next step.

1. Cost

Source: Thinkstock

Source: Thinkstock

Most of us try to stick to a budget as much as possible, and spending money on fitness can quickly eat away at your bank account. Even if you go with a low-cost option for your gym, you’ll spend money just by driving or taking public transportation to get there. There’s also the time cost to consider. If it takes you 20 minutes to get to the gym, you’re losing time that could otherwise be spent catching up on emails or getting a little bit of extra sleep.

If you’re looking to save money, there are a number of free options. Brad’s Deals listed a number of choices for those looking to minimize paying for fitness, including YouTube’s BeFit channel. This fitness hub includes workouts from tons of different trainers and, while there are plenty of short tips, there are also loads of full-length videos that will deliver a serious workout. The article also mentioned Physical Fitnet as a good choice for those looking to target specific muscle groups. Be aware of hidden costs, though. Some workouts are going to require equipment like dumbbells or resistance bands. If you don’t already have some basic workout gear at your place, you’ll likely need to make a few purchases.

For those who don’t mind spending a little bit of money, some of the best streaming services come with subscription fees. Health revealed five of their favorites. While some are definitely geared toward women, Crunch Live is a great option for anyone. At just $10 a month, it’s also a complete bargain.

2. Flexibility

sit ups, home, exercise

Source: iStock

If you’ve worked with a personal trainer before, you know how difficult it can be to find an open slot that works with your schedule. Some of the most popular one-on-one instructors might be completely booked during the times when you’re available to squeeze in a workout. Even if you go the standard gym route and exercise alone, some of them have inflexible hours. If you get stuck at the office on a busy day, you could miss your workout window. Jess Gronholm, an online yoga instructor, told Reuters that streaming fitness videos offers a degree of flexibility that traditional gyms just can’t match. That means an 11 p.m. workout is now a complete possibility.

If you find yourself hitting the road often, streamed fitness classes are a complete life-saver. Fit Bottomed Girls explained that these workouts are always an option for times when you may find yourself far away from a gym, or if a hotel fitness center is sub-par. In short, they eliminate some of the biggest excuses people make for neglecting their workouts.

3. Motivation

hotel

Source: iStock

Stepping out the door can sometimes be the worst part of working out. When you don’t have to leave the comfort of your own home, enjoying a couple extra sips of coffee will probably make the prospect of lacing up a lot less daunting. All you have to do is push play. CBS News reported that while 54 million Americans have a gym membership, less than half of them use it regularly. Video streaming, on the other hand, is rapidly growing in the fitness space.

Gym intimidation can play a role as well. About Health revealed that everything from insanely fit folks to complex equipment can keep plenty of people from getting a workout. And many of the trainers featured in online videos are used to dealing with hesitant clients. Even if it’s just a corny mantra, they know how to make you want to keep pushing.

4. Goals

Source: Thinkstock

Source: Thinkstock

Whether you’re seeking weight loss or some killer calf muscles, setting goals is one of the most important things you can do to ensure workout success. Unless you’re training for a specific race or event, it can be kind of hard to nail down what you’re going for. That can lead to a lot of mindless time on the elliptical or repetition after repetition of bicep curls. If you go with a fitness streaming service, you’ll be faced with opportunities that help you to recognize what you should prioritize. The Los Angeles Times reported Daily Burn’s service includes features that monitor your calorie burn and allow you to track your progress compared to others in your age group. If, for example, you see that you’re in the bottom 20% of your group, you can quickly resolve to make it into the top 50%.

If you’re feeling a little lost on where to get started, Health offered some great tips on how to most effectively set goals. Some suggestions include, picking something measurable and being sure to stay realistic. Reaching for something outlandish will just leave you feeling defeated.

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