5 Reasons Why You’ll Never Get a Raise

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There are many ways to increase your chances of getting a raise: you should schedule a meeting with your boss, document all your hard work, and know what you’re worth. If you’re part of a company that just doesn’t have the funds to give out raises, you might want to either stick it out for a while and see if things change or start looking for a new job. However, if you aren’t doing a good job in your position, it won’t matter when or how you ask your boss — you won’t be getting a raise anytime soon. There are several things that are detrimental to the chance of getting a raise, including poor job performance, unreliability, and several other potential issues. Read on to see if you are hurting your chance of getting a raise.

1. You haven’t asked for a raise

If you’re working hard and you take your job seriously, being afraid to ask for a raise may be the only reason you haven’t received one. Eighty-four percent of bosses expect workers to ask for a raise, but only 41 percent of Americans actually ask; simply not asking can tell your boss that you don’t think you deserve a raise. On the other hand, asking for a raise doesn’t guarantee you one, but it certainly improves your chances. You can increase your chances even further by setting up a meeting with your boss, bringing proof of your hard work, and choosing a time when your company is making a good profit. Even if your boss says no, a meeting is a great time to ask what you can do in the future to potentially get a raise down the line.

2. Your work is inconsistent

Source: Thinkstock

Source: Thinkstock

If your work is poor, you should probably be worried more about getting fired than trying to get a raise. If your work is inconsistent, it will be hard to prove that you deserve a raise. Many workers ask for raises when times get tough financially — for example, if you have a sick relative, if your spouse loses his or her job, or if you can’t afford your mortgage — but while your boss might be sympathetic, a financial hardship alone won’t get you a raise. Some bosses actually might find sharing your financial woes as unprofessional. Either way, you need to work hard to deserve a raise. If you are helping your company increase profits one month and blowing off important meetings with influential clients another, your boss might not want to can you just yet but won’t be handing you extra money, either.

3. Your boss doesn’t know you deserve a raise

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While you never want to brag to an employer, you should make an effort to have your hard work be noticed. This is a tricky issue, because while just doing what your boss assigns may mean doing a good job, it often isn’t enough. You should take extra initiative frequently if you want to be noticed. Make sure that you are volunteering for important projects and trying as much as possible to leave an imprint of your work (without being annoying about it). While you will rarely have the chance to brag, you can keep track of extra work you do and share it with your boss at your annual performance review or during a meeting ,if you ask for one. If you are simply doing your coworker’s duties for them and not getting any recognition for it, you won’t get a raise. A positive work ethic and attitude goes a long way, but not if no one notices.

4. You’re failing to update your skills

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Source: Thinkstock

Even when you’re working hard and helping your coworkers consistently, that may not be enough if your skills are out of date. This can particularly be a problem if you have been at your company for a long time: You may have been hired straight out of college, but now you are facing stiff competition from coworkers who have more education or more training than you do. You can help your case by taking certification courses, or if your company reimburses educational expenses, you can take classes at night. A raise also might be contingent on getting a promotion or better job title, and your company might have set policies about the educational requirements for specific positions. According to the Department of Labor, employees with a college degree earned about 77 percent more than those with a high school diploma (over the past few decades), so although being with your company for a long time may help you keep your job, it might not help you get a raise.

5. You have too many issues

Source: Thinkstock

Source: Thinkstock

This is a definite deterrent to a boss looking for a star employee. If you consistently don’t listen (for example, your boss asks you for a five-page report and you bring a three-page report — for the third time this month), your boss will notice. Although sometimes employees won’t be penalized for poor attention to details because some bosses may just see it as a personality flaw, that flaw will certainly be considered when it’s time for a raise. You will also hurt your chances if you have a bad attitude or don’t get along with your coworkers. Lastly, if you are often late to work or you are sick too often, you probably won’t get a raise. Some salaried employees believe that as long as they stay at work until their work is done they’re golden, but most bosses will notice if you come into work whenever you want regardless of the traditional starting time — even if you stay late.

There are many other reasons you may never get a raise, some of which are out of your control (your company can’t afford it or your boss picks favorites), and many that are in your control (you don’t do your research to know how much you are worth, you consistently have an entitled attitude, or you complain too much). Even though it may hurt to admit it, even small personal issues like forgetting to wear deodorant or rarely shaving (bot not intentionally growing a beard), or even just avoiding all work social gatherings, can be frustrating to employers. If you don’t take care of yourself, why should they take care of your salary?

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