5 Ways to Show Your Boss You Can Handle More Responsibility at Work

Sometimes we are so busy at work that the last thing we want is more responsibility, because we just don’t have time for it. However, for many of us, the idea of more responsibility is exciting in many ways. Taking on more responsibility can challenge your abilities, use your skills, and potentially lead to a promotion. However, unless your boss is overwhelmed with work to delegate, you may have to ask for more responsibility at work. While the majority of bosses would be glad to have an employee who is eager to do more work, a good boss will only want to give extra work to an employee who they trust and can do a good job.

In order to get greater responsibility, you have to earn it. Greater responsibility doesn’t always mean that you will have more busywork; you may even have a chance to become more of a leader, or work on more important accounts. Here are five ways to show you want and can handle more responsibility.

Source: Thinkstock

Source: Thinkstock

1. Be interested

Most employers won’t want an employee who shows little interest in their own job or the company to be a leader. You won’t earn progressively more responsibility unless you show that you are committed and interested in the company. You can do this in several ways. Know about your company: know the clients, the workers, and all other important information. Be careful to make your reports pertinent, thorough, and if possible, necessary, to your company. If possible, ask your boss if you can help prepare important presentations and sit in on meetings. If you do meet with potential clients, take those relationships seriously. One of the first steps to showing your boss that you can handle more responsibility is to show your interest in your job and the place you work.

Source: Thinkstock

Source: Thinkstock

2. Build your skills

Whether you want more responsibility because you are bored or because eventually you hope for a promotion (or both), building your skills will help you. Certain job duties require specific skills, so even if you are responsible, and even if you ask to do a certain project, you won’t be able to do it unless you have the necessary skills. Many bosses are impressed when workers take extra college courses, so do so if you can, especially if your company pays for the courses. Also, volunteer to attend (and if possible, present) at conferences. Participate in certification programs if you can. Even if you don’t have time right now to take classes or travel to conferences, you can learn from your coworkers and your boss, so go ahead and ask them.

Source: Thinkstock

Source: Thinkstock

3. Work well with others

Get along with your coworkers. This is vital in any career situation, but it is especially important if you want to become a manager or supervisor. Your boss needs to know that you can interact with your coworkers in a pleasant way. It’s also important that you show leadership qualities; take initiative on projects, but also be open to hearing other people’s ideas and working with them. Even if you don’t want to be in a supervisory role, just showing that you value other people’s opinions shows that you are responsible. Also, help other people when you can. If you consistently help your teammates, your boss will be more open to assigning you more work because you will have already proved that you can handle it and that you are dependable.

According to Monster, it’s also important to meet your deadlines when you are working with a team, to be adaptable, and to be honest.

Source: Thinkstock

Source: Thinkstock

4. Ask for it

Unless your company or department is experiencing a really busy time, you will probably need to ask for boss for more responsibility if you want it. Even if you are temporarily doing more work, that might lessen once the busy season is over. Plus, if the work you are doing is mostly busy work, that won’t really help you earn more responsibility. Start by scheduling a meeting with your boss to discuss your current job duties. Have a plan ahead of time so that you know exactly what you want to say. The point of your meeting should be to clearly explain why you want more responsibility, and not to just demand it. Remember that although greater responsibility may eventually lead to a job title change, this isn’t the point of your initial meeting.

Source: Thinkstock

Source: Thinkstock

5. Prove yourself

Hopefully, you have been a consistent worker and always done a thorough job completing your current job duties. If you haven’t, you might have a difficult time convincing your boss that you deserve more responsibility. If your boss does agree to give you more responsibility, make sure that you take even the smallest change in duties seriously. You need to prove that you can handle your original job duties, as well as any changes that your boss suggests. Don’t scoff at minor changes either; it’s possible that your boss will start with a few small changes before greatly increasing your duties. Much like you would on a resume, you will need to show that you are a hard worker, and not just say it. If you meet with your boss again, have examples ready to show him or her.

In most situations, you will probably have to prove that you can handle more work. So make an effort to finish all your work on time and to do your best if you want to take on more responsibility.

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