Donald Trump has More Money Than These Countries

Eric Trump, Lara Yunaska Trump, Donald Trump, Barron Trump, Melania Trump, Vanessa Haydon Trump, Kai Madison Trump, Donald Trump Jr., Donald John Trump III, Jared Kushner, Ivanka Trump, and Tiffany Trump pose for photos

The Trump family poses for photos | Christopher Gregory/Getty Images

A personal net worth of $3.7 billion makes President Donald Trump one of the wealthiest United States presidents in history. And he comes with a cabinet whose net worth is $4.5 billion. He built his fortune in New York real estate, following the footsteps of his father Frederick Trump, whose apartment rental company, Elizabeth Trump & Son Co., is what we now know as the Trump Organization.

Trump’s commerce — mostly in real estate — spreads far and wide. According to his financial disclosures, he owns or controls more than 500 companies in about two dozen countries. In China, his plans included building 20 to 30 hotels. In neighboring Canada, the president has stakes in 14 businesses, again including hotels and condo projects.

These represent only a portion of his many hidden pockets of net worth, which is more than the gross domestic products of some countries. Here are 30 countries with a lower GDP than Trump’s net worth.

1. São Tomé and Príncipe

The Sao Tome and Principe athletics team

The Sao Tome and Principe athletics team | Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images

GDP estimate 2016: $351 million

This African island nation is the 206th largest export economy in the world. It had a population of 190,344 in 2015, according to the World Bank. Its official language is Portuguese. Sao Tome and Principe is a big cocoa beans exporter, earning the country $11 million. Its top export destinations include Belgium-Luxembourg, Poland, and Turkey.

2. Tonga

Tonga's flag bearer, luger Bruno Banani, leads his delegation

Tonga’s flag bearer, luger Bruno Banani, leads his delegation | Andrej Isakovic/Getty Images

GDP estimate 2016: $430 million

The Kingdom of Tonga is a Polynesian sovereign state that comprises 169 islands, mostly uninhabited. The country’s population was 106,170 in 2015, and its official languages are English and Tongan. Its top exports include non-fillet fresh fish, vegetables, cassava, and cocoa beans.

3. Dominica

Dominica's flag bearer parades in front of his delegation

Dominica’s flag bearer parades in front of his delegation | William West/Getty Images

GDP estimate 2016: $524 million

The commonwealth of Dominica is a Caribbean island country that separated from the West Indies Associated States in 1967 and gained independence from the United Kingdom in 1978. Its official language is English. In 2015, its population was 72,680. Its top exports include refined petroleum, soap, and petroleum gas.

4. Comoros

Feta Ahamada of the Comoros Olympic athletics team carries her country's flag

Feta Ahamada of the Comoros Olympic athletics team carries her country’s flag | Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images

GDP estimate 2016: $622 million

Comoros is an island on the Indian ocean with a population of 788,474 in 2015. In 2014, the country had a trade balance deficit of $139 million. Its top exports include cloves, vanilla, essential oils, and scrap vessels. India is the biggest market for Comoros exports, followed by Germany, France, and Singapore.

5. St. Vincent and Grenadines

Kineke Alexander of the Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Olympic athletics team

Kineke Alexander of the St. Vincent and the Grenadines Olympic athletics team | Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images

GDP estimate 2016: $766 million

The Caribbean island nation of St. Vincent and Grenadines gained independence from the United Kingdom in 1979. It had a population of 109, 462 in 2015. Its top exports include passenger and cargo ships, recreational boats, wheat flours, scrap vessels, and refined petroleum. Its top export destinations are Poland, Saint Lucia, and Barbados.

6. Vanuatu

The Vanuatu delegation wave flags as they attend the Olympics

The Vanuatu delegation wave flags as they attend the Olympics | Marc Le Chelard/Getty Images

GDP estimate 2016: $773 million

The pacific ocean island of Vanuatu had a population of 264,652 in 2015. Residents speak Bislama, French, and English. The island exports non-fillet fresh fish, tug boats, passenger and cargo ships, and perfume plants to destinations, including South Africa, Thailand, Japan, and South Korea.

7. Samoa

Brandon Schuster of Samoa carries his country flag as he lead the Samoa team

Brandon Schuster of Samoa carries his country flag as he lead the Samoan team | Mark Kolbe/Getty Images

GDP estimate 2016: $876 million

Samoa was known as Western Samoa until 1997 and consists of two main islands, Savai’i and Upolu, as well as four smaller islands. It had a population of 193,228 as of 2015. Samoa is a member of commonwealth nations following its independence from New Zealand in 1962. It’s the 193rd largest export economy in the world, known for exporting insulated wire, beer, non-fillet frozen fish, and furniture. Its main export markets are Australia, New Zealand, and the United States.

8. Gambia

People wave Gambian flags during a protest

People wave Gambian flags during a protest | Seyllou/AFP/Getty Images

GDP estimate 2016: $886 million

Gambia, the smallest of African mainland countries, is the 177th largest export economy in the world. The country officially speaks English. It exports coconuts, yarn-woven fabric, Brazil nuts, and cashews to countries, including China, Mali, India, and Guinea. In 2015, its population was 1,990,924.

10. St. Kitts and Nevis

Cloud formations over the volcanic peak on Nevis

Cloud formations over the volcanic peak on Nevis | Chris Jackson/Getty Images

GDP estimate 2016: $955 million

The West Indies island nation of St. Kitts and Nevis is the world’s 190th largest export economy. Situated between the Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean Sea, the two-island country had a population of 55,572 in 2015. Its official language is English. It mainly exports passenger and cargo ships, broadcasting equipment, and refined petroleum.

11. Grenada

fan holding the flag of Grenada

Fan holding the flag of Grenada | Greg Baker/Getty Images

GDP estimate 2016: $1 billion

Also known as the island of spice, Grenada is the second-largest producer of nutmeg after Indonesia. The country is seeing a shift from an agrarian economy to a service-oriented one, leading with tourism. In 2015, the country’s population was 106,825. Apart from nutmeg, Grenada also exports cocoa beans, animal food, and wheat flour to countries, including the United States, St. Lucia, Germany, and the Netherlands.

12. Guinea-Bissau

A soldier of Guinea-Bissau lowers the flag

A soldier of Guinea-Bissau lowers the flag | Seyllou/Getty Images

GDP estimate 2016: $1.17 billion

The West African country of Guinea-Bissau is approximately 14,000 square miles with a population of 1.8 million in 2015. Residents officially speak Portuguese. Since it gained independence in 1973, no president has completed a full five-year term in the country. Its top exports include coconuts, Brazil nuts and cashews, rough wood, and non-fillet fresh fish to countries, including India, China, Vietnam, and the Netherlands.

13. Solomon Islands

Jenly Wini of the Solomon Islands carries the flag

Jenly Wini of the Solomon Islands carries the flag | Cameron Spencer/Getty Images

GDP estimate 2016: $1.2 billion

The sovereign country of the Solomon Islands, consisting of six big and 900 smaller islands, is a constitutional monarchy with Queen Elizabeth II as the head of state. The country gained independence from the British rule in 1978. English is its official language. As the 160th largest export economy, the Solomon Islands export rough wood, processed fish, palm oil, gold, and coconut oil. In 2015, the population was 583,591.

14. Antigua and Barbuda

Daniel Bailey of the Antigua and Barbuda Olympic athletics team carries his country's flag

Daniel Bailey of the Antigua and Barbuda Olympic team carries his country’s flag | Alex Livesey/Getty Images

GDP estimate 2016: $1.3 billion

The English speaking twin-island country of Antigua and Barbuda lies between the Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea. Like the Solomon Islands, Antigua and Barbuda’s reigning queen since its independence in 1981 is Queen Elizabeth II. The country is a member of the United Nations, as well as the Commonwealth of Nations. Its population in 2015 was 91,818.

15. Seychelles

Seychelles' flag bearer Rodney Govinden leads his national delegation

Seychelles’ flag bearer Rodney Govinden leads his national delegation | Franck Fife/Getty Images

GDP estimate 2016: $1.41 billion

The English- and French-speaking Indian Ocean island nation of Seychelles ranks 165 among export economies of the world. The island nation gained independence in 1976. It exports mainly processed fish, non-fillet fresh fish, fish oil, and cement. It imports boats, cars, planes, and helicopters. In 2015, its population was 92,900.

16. Saint Lucia

Flag bearer and Athlete Leverin Spencer of Saint Lucia

Flag bearer and athlete Leverin Spencer of Saint Lucia | Hannah Peters/Getty Images

GDP estimate 2016: $1.44 billion

The island of Saint Lucia lies in the eastern Caribbean Sea bordering the Atlantic Ocean and stretches over 238 square miles. It is the 172nd largest export economy. Top exports include jewelry, refined petroleum, and beer to destinations, including Suriname, Barbados, the United States and Trinidad and Tobago. The country gained independence in 1979 and became a part of the Commonwealth of Nations. Its population as of 2015 was 184,999.

17. San Marino

Alessandra Perilli of the San Marino Olympic shooting team carries her country's flag

Alessandra Perilli of the San Marino Olympic shooting team carries her country’s flag | Lars Baron/Getty Images

GDP estimate 2016: $1.56 billion

The least-populated country in the Council of Europe, San Marino stretches over 24 square miles and is situated on the Italian peninsula. In 2015, its population was 31,781. The country’s uses the euro as its currency but is not a part of the European Union or the Eurozone. Its top exports include woodworking machines and woven cotton to markets, including Romania, Austria, Germany and Brazil.

18. Cabo Verde

A Cape Verde fan holds a flag aloft during the 2013 African Cup of Nations

A Cape Verde fan holds a flag during the 2013 African Cup of Nations | Steve Haag/Getty Images

GDP estimate 2016: $1.68 billion

Cape Verde, or Cabo Verde, is an island country in West Africa, spanning over an archipelago of 10 volcanic islands in the Atlantic Ocean. It had a population of 520,502 in 2015. The country gained independence from Portugal in 1975, and its official language is Portuguese. It’s the world’s 185th largest export economy with its top exports being non-fillet fresh fish, processed fish, scrap iron, and footwear parts to countries, including Spain, Portugal, Morocco, and Italy.

19. Belize

Brandon Jones of Belize carries the flag

Brandon Jones of Belize carries the flag | Cameron Spencer/Getty Images

GDP estimate 2016: $1.77 billion

Situated on the eastern coast of Central America, Belize was formerly known as British Honduras. Its official language is English. It boarders Mexico, Guatemala, and the Caribbean Sea. In 2015, its population was 359,287. The country was a British colony from 1862 until 1981, when it gained independence. Its top exports include bananas, raw sugar, crustaceans, and crude petroleum to the United States, United Kingdom, Mexico, and the Netherlands.

20. Central African Republic

People wave flags of the Central African Republic as they walk to show support to a peace forum

People wave flags of the Central African Republic as they walk to show support to a peace forum | Guy-Gervias Kitina/Getty Images

GDP estimate 2016: $1.78 billion

The landlocked country of Central African Republic is surrounded by Chad to the north, South Sudan to the east, Cameroon to the west, and the Democratic Republic of Congo to the Southwest. It ranks 189th among export economies for exporting rough wood, raw cotton, sawn wood, and diamonds. Its official languages are French and Sango. The country ranked as one of the lowest (187 of 188) on the Human Development Index. In 2015, its population was 4.9 million.

21. Lesotho

A herd boy in front of the Lesothan flag

A boy in front of the Lesothan flag | Chris Jackson/Getty Images

GDP estimate 2016: $1.8 billion

Lesotho is another landlocked country surrounded by South Africa, spanning over approximately 11,600 square miles. The country gained independence from the United Kingdom in 1966 and consequently became a member of the United Nations, Commonwealth of Nations, and South African Development Community. It ranked 161 on the Human Development Index. Its population in 2015 was about 2.1 million. Its official languages are English and Sesotho. Clothing constitutes 40 percent of the country’s exports, followed by diamonds, tobacco, wool, and water.

22. Djibouti

Salah Houssein Ahmed Djibouti's flag bearer parades in front of his delegation

Djibouti’s flag bearer parades in front of his delegation | William West/Getty Images

GDP estimate 2016: $1.89 billion

Bordered by Eritrea, Ethiopia, and Somalia, Djibouti is a country situated on the horn of Africa stretching over 8,900 square miles. Residents speak French, Arabic, Somali, and Afar. The country was a French colony until 1977, after which it joined the Arab League, United Nations, and African Union. Its top exports include coffee, wood charcoal, rubber tires, and dried legumes to markets, including the Netherlands, Spain, Kuwait, and Slovakia. Its population in 2015 was 887,861.

23. Bhutan

Bhutanese football supporters hold their national flag

Bhutanese football supporters hold their national flag | Lakruwan Wanniarachchi/Getty Images

GDP estimate 2016: $2.08 billion

The Kingdom of Bhutan is the smallest state in Asia. It is a landlocked country located on the Himalayan mountain range, surrounded by China and India. It’s the least populous nation after the Maldives in South Asia, with 774,830 people in 2015. The country is a constitutional monarchy and its top exports include ferroalloys, carbides, sand, and raw plastic sheeting to destinations, including India, Germany, and Italy.

24. Liberia

A woman sitting by a mural showing Liberia's national flag

A woman sitting by a mural showing Liberia’s national flag | Dominique Faget/Getty Images

GDP estimate 2016: $2.17 billion

Surrounded by Sierra Leone, Ivory Coast, and Guinea, Liberia is situated on the West African coast and stretches over 43,000 square miles. Its official language is English. It is the 153rd largest export economy in the world. It exports passenger and cargo ships, iron ore, rubber, rough wood, and cocoa beans to countries, including China, Poland, Germany, and Greece.

25. Timor-Leste

Athletes from East Timor march during at the opening ceremony of the biennial Southeast Asian (SEA) Games

Athletes from East Timor march during at the opening ceremony of the Southeast Asian Games | Roslan Rahman/Getty Images

GDP estimate 2016: $2.5 billion

The sovereign nation of Timor-Leste is located in maritime Southeast Asia. It comprises the eastern half of the island of Timor and other smaller neighboring islands, spanning over 5,400 square miles. The country gained independence from Indonesia, and in 2002 it became the first new sovereign state of the 21st century. Its official languages are Portuguese and Tetum. Coffee, crude petroleum, petroleum gas, and railway cargo containers are its top exports to South Korea, Japan, Germany, and Australia. In 2015, its population was 1.2 million.

26. South Sudan

Guor MArial of South Sudan carries the flag

Guor Marial of South Sudan carries the flag | Cameron Spencer/Getty Images

GDP estimate 2016: $2.63 billion

South Sudan is the 116th largest export economy in the world, a landlocked country that gained independence from Sudan in 2011. Its official language is English. The country is a member of the United Nations and the African Union. Its top exports include crude petroleum, oil seed flower, tanned sheep hides, and stone processing machines to China, India, Algeria, and Uganda. Its population as of 2015 was 12.3 million.

27. Burundi

Around 2000 women march through the streets of Burumjura on September 3, 2016, to protest against a UN decision

Women march through the streets of Burumjura | Onesphore Nibigira/AFP/Getty Images

GDP estimate 2016: $2.74 billion

The landlocked country of Burundi in East Africa speaks French. With a population of 11 million in 2015, it is one of the smallest countries in Africa, also largely rural. Its exports include coffee, tea, soap, and plastic lids. It imports cars, delivery trucks, and refined petroleum.

28. Maldives

Athletes from the Maldives team waves flags

Athletes from the Maldives team waves flags | Mark Kolbe/Getty Images

GDP estimate 2016: $3.27 billion

The South Asian island country of the Maldives lies to the southwest of India and Sri Lanka. Spanning over 115 square miles, it is the smallest country in the region. Its official language is Maldivian. Fish tops its exports list, and the country imports refined petroleum, petroleum gas, planes, helicopters, and furniture.

29. Swaziland

Kingdom of Swaziland flag flies on a mast by a public school

Kingdom of Swaziland flag flies on a mast by a public school | Getty Images

GDP estimate 2016: $3.43 billion

The sovereign state of Swaziland is one of the smallest states in South Africa, with a population of 1.28 million in 2015. Swaziland is an absolute monarchy, ruled by King Mswati III. Swaziland’s main exports include sugar, wood pulp, cotton, and beef, mostly to neighboring South Africa, Mozambique, Botswana, Namibia, and Norway.

30. Guyana

Winston George of the Guyana Olympic athletics team

Winston George of the Guyana Olympic athletics team | Lars Baron/Getty Images

GDP estimate 2016: $3.46 billion

The sovereign state of Guyana is situated on the northern mainland of South America and is bordered by the Atlantic Ocean to the north, Brazil to the south, Suriname to the east, and Venezuela to the west. It extends over 83,000 square miles. The country speaks Guyanese Creole and English. Its top exports include gold, rice, aluminum ore, raw sugar, and crustaceans to countries, including the United States, Canada, Venezuela, and the United Kingdom.