The Pros (and Cons) of Having More Than One Job

Source: iStock

Source: iStock

With the holidays quickly approaching, many of us are thinking about how we are going to afford holiday travel and gift buying. Some people consider getting a seasonal job just to help with all the added expenses, since many retail stores hire part-time workers for the busy holiday months. Obtaining a part-time temporary job can be a great way to make extra money if you only need the money temporarily. If you are hoping to find a second or third job for long-term financial, career, or other reasons, you probably will want to look for something more permanent than a seasonal position.

There are several advantages and disadvantages to having multiple jobs, and some are not as obvious as the additional money that comes with holding multiple jobs. If you are considering taking on another job, there are several pros and cons that you should consider before doing so.

Many people have one full-time job, but in 2012 5% of the working population in the United States had more than one job at a time. According to 24/7 Wall St., the states with the most people working two jobs included Wyoming, Iowa, Montana, North Dakota, Minnesota, Maine, Kansas, Nebraska, Vermont, and South Dakota.

The pros

People may take on a second (or third) job for financial reasons, but there are other valid reasons to do so as well. Besides the extra money, another pro of having a second job is the possible experience and skills that job can give you. If you need extra work to add to your resume, then a second job can give you that work. If you love your current job but you feel that you need to learn more important skills, then an additional job can help. According to Snagajob, getting a second job can also help you fight boredom, save for something you want, improve your resume by showing that you can handle two jobs at once, help you explore a new career, and help you make new friends and connections.

A second job can also be positive if you cannot get a full-time job. If you want to work more but you can only find part-time jobs, then it is still a good idea to work two, three, or however many part-time jobs that you need to work in order to keep your résumé up-to-date and make enough money.

The cons of working multiple jobs

On the other hand, if your current job requires long hours, or is a very stressful one, you may not want to take on a second job. Too much stress can affect your health. According to the Huffington Post, stress can affect men’s health because it can actually make you appear less physically attractive, potentially lead to heart disease, potentially lead to gene expression changes to sperm, accelerate prostate cancer development, and contribute to erectile dysfunction.

Even if you don’t have a stressful job, taking on a second or third job could affect your productivity level. If you are always tired or preoccupied, it can be difficult to do your best when you are at work or at home. This can potentially affect your family life as well if you are more irritable, or you have less energy or time to spend with friends or family members.

The more hours you work, the less time you will have to complete regular tasks like chores and bills, or to exercise or participate in hobbies that you love. If you work all week, and possibly all weekend, it can be difficult to get everything done that you need to do each week, or to find time to do things that you enjoy.

There are pros and cons to holding multiple jobs. If you need the money, you might not have a choice either way. If you can find a second job that allows you to do something you love, then you might feel less stressed and be able to participate in a hobby or talent you like while making money (for example, photography or music gigs). However, if you find that holding multiple jobs makes you too stressed, lessens your productivity at your primary job, or leaves no time for family or fun, you might be better sticking to just one job.

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