The 3 Kinds of Jobs Workers Hate the Most

Source: Thinkstock

Source: Thinkstock

On days when things seem to be continuously going wrong at work, a worker may utter the phrase “I hate my job.” Now, whether or not they really and truly feel this way is another story, but workers are sometimes quick to think or assert these types of negative feelings about their places of employment. Have you utteredĀ that phrase recently? If so, did you really mean it?

According to the American Institute of Stress, eight out of 10 workers (80%) feel stress on the job. So, it makes sense for a worker to occasionally feel overwhelmed, or even annoyed with his or her job. But, there is a difference between feeling occasionally stressed, and being consistently and completely unhappy in your current position, or with your current employer.

The research site Gallup published a survey in late 2013 finding that worldwide, the vast majority of workers (87%) felt some level of unhappiness at work. These workers were either “not engaged” — meaning their unhappiness started to impact their emotional commitment to their organizations — or “actively disengaged” — meaning that they, well, hate their jobs. Actively disengaged workers are so unhappy that it not only hinders their work, but this negativity can impact those around them as well.

Just recently, Gallup analyzed how workers felt about their jobs during the year 2014, and overall, 51% of U.S. employees were “not engaged” at work last year, and another 17.5% were “actively disengaged.” Although these results represent an improvement in engagement metrics when compared to the past several years, it’s still troubling to think about just how many people are unhappy at work.

Disengagement is present to some degree in all jobs and industries across the board. But, certain types of jobs displayed lower engagement metrics than others. Using three years of Gallup research on employee engagement, we’ve created a list of the types of jobs people seem to dislike the most. These jobs had the lowest percentages of engaged workers, as well as some of the highest percentages of disengaged workers.

Source: Thinkstock

Source: Thinkstock

3. Service jobs

  • Percentage of service employees who were engaged, as of 2014 (who like their jobs): 28.2%
  • Percentage of service employees who were engaged in 2013: 27.9%
  • Percentage of service employees who were engaged in 2012: 29%
  • Percentage of service employees who were “not engaged” (who were somewhat unhappy) in 2012: 50%
  • Percentage of service employees who were actively disengaged (who hated their jobs) in 2012: 22%

Source: Thinkstock

Source: Thinkstock

2. Transportation jobs

  • Percentage of transportation employees who were engaged, as of 2014 (who like their jobs): 25.5%
  • Percentage of transportation employees who were engaged in 2013: 24.1%
  • Percentage of transportation employees who were engaged in 2012: 25%
  • Percentage of transportation who were “not engaged” (who were somewhat unhappy) in 2012: 47%
  • “Actively disengaged” transportation employees (who hated their jobs) in 2012: 28%

Source: Thinkstock

Source: Thinkstock

1. Manufacturing and production jobs

  • Percentage of manufacturing and production employees who were engaged, as of 2014 (who like their jobs): 23%
  • Percentage of manufacturing and production employees who were engaged in 2013: 22%
  • Percentage of manufacturing and production employees who were engaged in 2012: 24%
  • “Not engaged” manufacturing and production employees (who were somewhat unhappy) in 2012: 50%
  • “Actively disengaged” manufacturing and production employees (who hated their jobs) in 2012: 26%

Other interesting findings

  • In spite of the stress that may come along with leadership positions, managers had the highest engagement metrics. That is, the most people are happy in management roles. Farming, forestry, and fishing occupations had the second-highest engagement metrics.
  • Age also impacts engagement. The younger the respondent, the less likely they were to say they were happy with their job. Only 28.9% of millennials said they were engaged in their jobs in 2014, compared to 32.7% of baby boomers, and 42.2% of traditionalists (born before 1946).
  • Remote workers (32%) tend to be more engaged than those who work on sight (28%), but only by a small percentage.

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