Are Cars Now Borrowing Your iPhone’s Glass?

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Now that Corning Incorporated’s (NYSE:GLW) durable Gorilla Glass has seen significant success in the tech industry, it’s ready to expand its footprint in the jungle, and it’s vying for automobiles next.

According to Technology Review, Jeffrey Evenson, senior vice president of Corning, addressed his audience Friday at the MIT Technology Review’s Mobile Summit contending that Gorilla Glass might be the next big thing on automakers’ radars as they continue to focus on producing lighter vehicles with better fuel economy. He believes Gorilla Glass could be the answer to their prayers, asserting that its lightweight material could effectively replace the standard glass currently used on automobiles’ windows, making the vehicles lighter and quieter inside.

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Evenson “expects at least one high-end auto maker to start making cars that use some Gorilla Glass within the year.” Now for him is it more a question of which one? Maybe it’ll be General Motors (NYSE:GM) as the company continues to post profitable quarters and is now looking to maintain its progress. After all, its CEO Dan Akerson did say in an address Thursday that he believes in-car technology will be the next big thing.  Does that “in-car technology” include windows, Dan?

Or maybe it’ll be Ford Motors Co (NYSE:F), as that U.S. automaker, too, is always looking for a gentle push as it continues its rebound.

Regardless of which automaker scoops up the technology, it is evident that Gorilla Glass isn’t going anywhere. Evenson doesn’t even believe it will stop there. Corning wants to develop the existing material further, so that it can appeal to other markets as well with the health-care industry especially in its sights.

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If the company can successfully manage “antimicrobial glass,” it could effectively appeal to markets that need their device interactions to be more sanitary. Gorilla Glass is already found in 1.5 billion electronic devices today, but this market could be expanded even further if Corning figures out a way to expunge the germs that thrive on people’s devices.

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