Why Beyoncé Fans Are Angry At Twitter Comments About Blue Ivy Carter

If anyone knows what the spotlight is like, it’s Beyoncé’s eldest daughter, Blue Ivy Carter. From the moment her mother’s pregnancy was announced at the 2011 MTV VMAs, she was a star. Carter was born in Jan. 2012, and made her musical debut on “Glory,” her father Jay-Z‘s track, released just days after her birth.

Blue Ivy Carter and Beyonce Knowles-Carter
Blue Ivy Carter and Beyonce Knowles-Carter | Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images for Disney

The Knowles-Carter family kept their daughter out of the spotlight for many years, with the girl only making occasional appearances. However, as she got older, she began to attend major events with her parents, like the premiere of The Lion King in July 2019 (as seen above). And now, she’s being dragged into the limelight in a negative fashion. Read on to learn more.

Carter is an accomplished 7-year-old

Given that she provided vocals for a song before she could even speak, Carter’s legacy began earlier than most. She has gone on to continue this tradition, earning vocal credit for songs like “Blue,” her mother’s dedication to her. And on Jay-Z’s album 4:44, she even gets her own track: “Blue’s Freestyle.”

Just when you thought she couldn’t get more accomplished, Carter goes out and wins an award. That’s right: In 2019, she won the Ashford & Simpson Songwriter’s Award at the BET Soul Train Awards for “Brown Skin Girl,” which she both sang on and co-wrote. Talk about a prodigy in the making.

She and her mom posed with Megan Thee Stallion

Given who her parents are, Carter often gets to rub elbows with some of the biggest stars. (After all, very few people are more notable than her parents themselves.) And she appears to have done just that on New Year’s Eve.

On Jan. 1, 2020, rapper Megan Thee Stallion posted some photos from a celebration that seemingly took place the night before. Simply captioning the two images “2020,” she shared her selfies with Queen Bey and the young Princess Carter while ringing in the new year.

Some terrible comments were made about Carter

One of the worst things about the internet is how it seems to embolden people who should know better to say terrible things. Case in point: K. Austin Collins, a film critic at Vanity Fair, wrote, “I have a feeling the jay z face genes are about to hit Blue Ivy and I feel so sorry for her” after the New Year’s Eve photos were posted. What’s more, Violet Lucca, a web editor at Harper’s Magazine, replied, and the situation escalated.

After they were called out, Collins deleted his tweets and apologized, and Lucca… said a few things, though never really said she was sorry. But screenshots live on forever, and most aren’t keen to let their comments go.

Twitter users fired back

Other verified Twitter users, like journalist Clarkisha Kent and author Mikki Kendall, highlighted what was wrong about Collins’ and Lucca’s remarks. Not only is she just a child, but a young girl of color. Promoting this attitude is without a doubt wrong.

And this isn’t even the first time this has happened. Back in 2016, after Carter attended the VMAs with her parents, numerous adults took to social media to call her “ugly.” Hopefully, this is the last time we hear about people making comments about her appearance.