Does ‘Dune’ Have a Post-Credits Scene?

Marvel movies are notorious for having a post-credits scene, leaving fans anticipating what’s to come in future installments. Even though the new sci-fi film Dune is not associated with the MCU, fans of the book series are curious if the movie will offer a post-credits scene at the end. The long run time and elaborate storyline could imply that Dune may take a page from the MCU playbook. Let’s take a closer look.

The new ‘Dune’ movie is based on the original book by Frank Herbert

Zendaya and Timothée Chalamet attend the red carpet of the movie 'Dune.'
Zendaya and Timothée Chalamet attend the red carpet of the movie ‘Dune.’ | Vittorio Zunino Celotto/Getty Images

Based on the original three-book series published by Frank Herbert in 1965, the movie centers around Paul Atreides, played by Timothée Chalamet. The young protagonist moves with his powerful family to the desert planet of Arrakis, commonly known as Dune.

It’s there where Paul learns of his destiny, along with what must be done in order to ensure the future of his family and his people. While fending off enormously terrifying sandworms, he discovers a powerful spice that can not only prolong human life, but can give people superhuman mind control powers. This spice can also allow intergalactic travelers to fold space and travel faster than the speed of light.

Zendaya guest stars in the film as Chani, a mysterious young woman with glowing blue eyes who captures the attention of Atreides. Josh Brolin and Jason Momoa take on the role of warriors who are tasked with training the main character. Other prominent actors appearing in Dune include Oscar Isaac, Rebecca Ferguson, Javier Bardem, Stellan Skarsgard, and Charlotte Rampling.

Is there a post-credits scene in ‘Dune’?

Denis Villeneuve is the writer and director of the newest adaptation of the classic tale. The French Canadian filmmaker is best known for his work on films that include Arrival, Enemy, and Blade Runner 2049. According to Inverse, the Oscar-nominated director only agreed to take on the project if he could split the movie into two parts. The second installment was recently approved and confirmed for an October 2023 release date.

Part One of Dune is currently in theaters and on HBO Max. It ends on a cliffhanger, leaving moviegoers wanting to know more of the story. While a post-credits scene would make sense, Villeneuve decided differently.

The acclaimed director told NME, “There is a very specific final emotion that I was looking for with the final frame [of Dune] and I don’t want to mess with that.” Villeneuve confirmed, “So no, I don’t use post-credits scenes. I’ve never done that and I would never.”

‘Dune’ closely follows the book series

In 1984, Twin Peaks creator David Lynch adapted the original book series into a movie. Villeneuve chose not to recreate that version but instead closely followed the book series.

GamesRadar explains the novel consists of three parts titled “Dune,” “Muad’dib,” and “The Prophet.” While Villeneuve follows this structure, he tells the story in two parts.

Lynch attempted to cram the complex world created by Herbert into one film, leaving fans of the series disappointed. Villeneuve took a different approach and spent two hours and 36 minutes telling only half the story in the new epic sci-fi movie. Dune: Part Two promises to contain the rest of the material from Herbert’s classic original.

According to Screen RantDune sets up Atreides as a “messianic hero,” with the first half ending at a perfect place. The theme of the second film will change as it “deconstructs the idea of the hero’s journey entirely.”

Lynch never had the time to tell the story in its entirety. Villeneuve made sure from the start to follow Herbert’s work and create a world of his own for the next generation to enjoy the iconic tale.

In creating a unique version of Dune, it becomes clear why the director decided not to follow the MCU format with a post-credits scene but instead stayed true to his vision for the desert world.

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