‘Gilmore Girls’: Rory Gilmore and Logan Huntzberger’s Entire Relationship Had a Celestial Theme

Gilmore Girls fans might not all agree on Rory Gilmore’s love life. While some viewers insist that Jess Mariano was Rory’s perfect match, others argue that Logan Huntzberger and Rory were meant to be. There are pros and cons to both beaus, but Rory and Logan might have been Gilmore Girls’ creator, Amy Sherman-Palladino’s endgame. At least, that would seem to be the case if you think the celestial theme to their relationship means something.

Rory and Logan met while both attending Yale

Theoretically, Logan and Rory should have known each other before college. Rory’s grandparents and Logan’s parents were friendly. Somehow, they never crossed paths before Yale. Rory and Logan met on the first day of Rory’s sophomore year of college. Logan, also a student at Yale, and Rory ran into each other at the coffee cart. Rory left no impression on Logan, who didn’t remember her the following day. Rory was less than impressed with the obviously wealthy Logan. It took several more episodes, but eventually, the duo fell into a friend with benefits situation that led to their first attempt at a relationship.

RELATED: ‘Gilmore Girls’: Should Rory Have Accepted Logan’s Proposal?

Logan and Rory briefly broke up in season 6, only to get back together. They remained together for the duration of the series but broke up when Rory turned down Logan’s marriage proposal at her college graduation. By the time fans caught up with them in the revival, they were having an affair. The bad behavior didn’t endear the couple to fans, but there is reason to believe the pair were destined to be together.

The couple’s relationship is dotted with celestial references

Rory and Logan fans point to the celestial theme that encompasses their relationship to prove the couple was destined to be together. Logan’s very first appearance occurs in an episode that has a cosmic theme. Logan first appears in the season 5 episode, “Written in the Stars.” While the episode title could point to Luke Danes and Lorelai Gilmore’s relationship, it could also be referencing Logan and Rory’s initial introduction and their serendipitous run-in in Rory’s hallway. One Reddit user points out that Logan demands Rory call him master and commander next time she sees him. The title is a reference to a movie of the same name about a ship captain.

Logan Huntzberger and Rory Gilmore stand in the middle of the street in Stars Hollow during filming of 'Gilmore Girls: A Year in the Life'
Logan Huntzberger and Rory Gilmore | Netflix

During the couple’s relationship, Sherman-Palladino drew in celestial themes several times. When Logan left for London, he gives Rory a model rocket. While Rory didn’t immediately understand the gift, she later explained that the rocket was supposed to mean Logan would wait forever for Rory, just like a character in a television episode they watched together. Later, Logan appeared back in Connecticut and tricked Rory into coming to the roof of their apartment building with a fake meteor shower.

Does that mean Rory and Logan were meant to be together when Gilmore Girls ended?

Sherman-Palladino never got a chance to write Rory and Logan’s ending. A different writer penned the final season of Gilmore Girls.  Sherman-Palladino walked away from the series over a contract dispute. While another writer ultimately broke Logan and Rory up, it doesn’t seem like it’s what Sherman-Palladino planned.

RELATED: ‘Gilmore Girls’: Is Logan and Rory’s Relationship Supposed to Mimic Richard and Emily’s Love Story?

When fans caught back up with Rory and Logan in Gilmore Girls: A Year in the Life, the duo weren’t in a relationship. Instead, they were carrying on an affair. Fans also assume that Logan is the father of Rory’s baby, forever linking them to each other. Unfortunately, fans will never know exactly how Sherman-Palladino initially planned to end Rory and Logan’s relationship. Still, if the revival’s ending is an indication, they were always meant to be in each other’s lives.