Prince Harry Told Biographer It Was Prince William Who ‘Saved’ Him and Convinced Him to Go to Therapy, Not Meghan

Since stepping down as senior royals and moving to America, Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex have publicly discussed and gave their side of the story about what life was like for them as part of Britain’s most famous family.

The pair did an explosive interview with Oprah Winfrey before Harry went on Dax Shepard’s podcast and took more shots at his father, Prince Charles. The Duke of Sussex also opened up about his mental health journey in his and Oprah’s Apple TV+ docuseries The Me You Can’t See. However, what he’s saying now and what he has said in the past about why he chose to start therapy are completely different leaving many, including his biographer, to question what’s true and what isn’t.

Meghan Markle, Prince Harry, and Prince William, standing on the balcony of Buckingham Palace for a flypast in 2018
Meghan Markle, Prince Harry, and Prince William, standing on the balcony of Buckingham Palace for a flypast in 2018 | Max Mumby/Indigo/Getty Images

Prince Harry said a fight with Meghan inspired him to get therapy but told his biographer a different story

In the Apple+ docuseries, the prince said that his wife is the person who inspired him to seek help for his mental health.

“It was meeting and being with Meghan, I knew that if I didn’t do therapy and fix myself, that I was going to lose this woman who I could see spending the rest of my life with,” he explained (per People). “There was a lot of learning right at the beginning of our relationship. She was shocked to be coming backstage of the institution of the British royal family. When she said, ‘I think you need to see someone,’ that was in reaction to an argument we had. And in that argument, not knowing about it, I reverted back to 12-year-old Harry.”

But when Harry spoke candidly about the same subject a few years prior he reportedly made it clear to biographer Angela Levin that it was actually his brother Prince William, not Meghan, who was behind his decision to get therapy.

Prince William, Meghan Markle, and Prince Harry seated next to each other during an Anzac Day service at Westminster Abbey
Prince William, Meghan Markle, and Prince Harry seated next to each other during an Anzac Day service at Westminster Abbey | Eddie Mulholland – WPA Pool/Getty Images

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During an appearance on Good Morning Britain, Levin recalled the conversation she had with Harry when she asked him: “Are you going because Meghan suggested it?” To which the prince responded: “Absolutely not, she had nothing to do with it, it was William. He was the one who saved me.”

Thinking back now Levin added: “Either he told me something that was not true or he’s saying something not true now.”

Commentator accuses Harry of ‘conveniently erasing what he has said before’

Prince William and Prince Harry visit to the Royal Foundation Support4Grenfell community hub in London
Prince William and Prince Harry visit to the Royal Foundation Support4Grenfell community hub in London | Samir Hussein/WireImage

Vanity Fair’s royal correspondent Katie Nicholl also spoke about how the Duke of Sussex is saying something different than what he has stated in the past about why he entered therapy.

“What I would like to hear Harry say is that the first person to suggest that he go into therapy was his brother,” Nicholl said on the Royal Beat (per The Express). “A lot of people are upset that Harry is conveniently erasing what he has said before and giving us this new narrative that it was his wife that got him into therapy when actually, initially it was his brother and his father that encouraged him to get it.”

Nicholl also questioned how much more the public wanted to hear Harry talk about his therapy. “I think it is worth making the point as well, that how much more of an appetite is there going to be for them talking about this subject?” she asked, adding, “How much more can you wring out of it? I just feel people, even in America where they seem to hang on every word this couple say, will say ‘we have heard enough, you have to change your tune now.'”

How to get help: In the U.S., contact the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration helpline at 1-800-662-4357.