‘Storage Wars’: How Much Are Dan and Laura Dotson Really Worth?

If you’ve watched A&E’s Storage Wars for the last nine years, then you’re probably familiar with the husband and wife auctioneer team of Dan and Laura Dotson. As longtime members of the show, their background in auctions is extensive and a popular part of this TV franchise.

You could say Dan Dotson mastered the amazing auctioneer chant better than anyone, which is no surprise considering his family line in the business. He and Laura also have their main business to focus on: American Auctioneers.

While arguments still go on about whether Storage Wars fakes their findings, the Dotsons are reportedly doing well financially. Let’s find out what their worth really is.

The Dotsons were part of the show from the beginning

Storage Wars 

Storage Wars | A&E

When Storage Wars began in 2010, the Dotsons became an integral element in auctioning off the storage items found. Dan already had extensive auctioneer experience going back to the early 1970s with his father and grandfather. No doubt this was a big factor in finding auctioneers with longstanding ethical credentials to lend credibility to the show.

Laura Dotson learned the business from her husband, including that famous auction chant inspiring attendees to bid. Even though she and Dan had to take a backseat to the main cast members, it didn’t take long for them to stand out.

Amid a past lawsuit from cast member Dave Hester about illegal practices on Storage Wars, the Dotsons have kept a respectable profile.

Starting a popular auction company

Dan Dotson started his own auction business in 1983 called American Auctioneers. He took this business to being the #1 auction company in California and even the nation more recently. In the early days, though, Dan ran the auction house out of Riverside, CA. He conducted multiple thousands of auctions for over a decade, with most attention on collectibles and even furniture.

He and Laura met in 1996 and went into business together, later marrying in 2000. Once Storage Wars started, the producers of the show considered them the backbone of how the show would work. Despite not being top-billed, it’s a true highlight when the auction segments of the show take place.

A year into the show’s run, USA Today did a profile on the show and mentioned the Dotsons were getting rich quick with their effective auctioning style.

Laura Dotson’s net worth

It’s best to look at the Dotsons’ net worth separately since they do make money under their own names. Laura is reportedly worth $4.5 million alone thanks to her help with Dan’s auction business and individual projects. Plus, she’s carved her own trademark by using the phrase “Don’t forget to pay the lady!” during each auction they lead.

She’s appeared as a guest on numerous TV shows since Storage Wars became a hit. Thanks to a strong marriage with Dan, they obviously share their worth, though which one ultimately makes the most within their business relationship?

Dan Dotson’s net worth

Official sources also list Dan’s net worth at $4.5 million, but it appears the media considers the Dotsons’ net worth one and the same. This makes sense considering they work equally in making their American Auctioneers business so successful nationwide.

Dan almost lost his life after suffering a double brain aneurysm in 2014. He managed to recover, and the Dotsons continued to prosper ever since. They even stay active on social media to keep themselves in the limelight.

Social media presence

Dan and Laura have separate Twitter accounts, yet post fairly consistently. Most of those tweets are to promote their latest auctions or a new episode of Storage Wars. They’ll occasionally post some personal pics, including with their son, Garrett.

Because their auctioneer life is a hustling existence, expect them to continue being TV stars since Storage Wars still receives strong ratings and has an offshoot on Netflix. At least when their reality show universe ends, they won’t have to scramble to find something else. Don’t be surprised to see an offshoot show someday called American Auctioneers.