The Most Frustrating Part of ‘The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild’ Might Not Bother Some

35 years ago, Nintendo came out with an action-adventure game called The Legend of Zelda. Since then, it transformed into a huge franchise with countless installments. Several of them gained high ratings from the gaming community, like Ocarina of Time

Breath of the Wild became the newest entry a few years ago. Players not only got to enjoy jumping for the first time, but they also could get creative with solving puzzles. Overall, Breath of the Wild was successful among fans, but the weapon system fell short. 

‘Breath of the Wild’ is a breath of fresh air

The logo of Japan's Nintendo Co.
The logo of Japan’s Nintendo Co. | BEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP via Getty Images

In 2017, Nintendo released its next installment of the Zelda series called Breath of the Wild. The game is available on the Nintendo Switch and Wii U. Upon release, the game sold millions of copies within a month. Breath of the Wild received positive reviews and several awards, and a sequel is in the works. 

The story once again takes place in the kingdom of Hyrule. Link wakes up from the Shrine of Resurrection with no memory of who he is. Over time, he regains memories of his life from 100 years ago and the events leading up to Hyrule’s downfall.

Previous installments unlocked new areas by following a linear path. Breath of the Wild changed the formula by making it an open world. Players go to every inch of the map to complete side quests and visit shrines. They can free the Divine Beasts in any order and without feeling rushed. 

Of course, people can opt not to do them and go straight to the final boss. The ultimate goal is to defeat the Calamity Ganon to free Zelda and Hyrule. 

Every weapon breaks in ‘Breath of the Wild’

Besides an open world, Breath of the Wild did multiple things differently compared to past games. Instead of the classic dungeons, Link has to complete shrines to obtain spirit orbs. The weapon system also is different in how players can collect various types of weapons. Link can wield the Master Sword or a stick. 

One aspect of the weapon system is the breaking mechanic. Swords, shields, and bows degrade the more a player uses them. Once something breaks, Link has to switch to another item. While the Master Sword stays put, it has limited uses before needing to recharge. 

There is no way a person can see how much durability an item has. Usually, the stronger it is, the more damage it can take. The purpose of the mechanic is to make the player experiment with new weapons for different situations. The game provides enough of them through enemies and chests. 

‘Legend of Zelda’ Fans are annoyed by the item degradation mechanic

Game Informer reveals how fans are frustrated with the item degradation in Breath of the Wild. Other games have had a similar mechanic. However, they may provide a way to repair the weapon. Breath of the Wild does not do that, so players lose valuable weapons for good. 

While the mechanic prevents people from leaning too much on one type, the game’s enormous scale turns it into a flaw. Players have the flexibility of shifting inventories and the ability to defeat an enemy however they can. Other RPGs allow someone to develop a unique play style, which Breath of the Wild does not. 

“The end result is this: Combat feels bland, designed to ensure that all roads lead to victory, regardless of players’ gear or skills,” article author Joe Juba wrote, “My power in combat is completely dependent on what random assortment of tools I’m carrying, not on any skills I’m improving as a player.” 

A few people may not feel too bothered by weapons breaking. Making sure the inventory is full of powerful weapons for big fights can seem like a chore to players. 

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