Questions We Have About ‘Dispatches from Elsewhere’ Season 1 Episode 1

Dispatches from Elsewhere Season 1 Episode 1, ‘Peter,’ laid the groundwork for a mysterious story arc. By the end of the episode, the show had connected the main characters and set up the idea that they would eventually begin working as a team. The first episode planted a few theories as to where the season is headed and triggered a few questions to ponder.

Eve Lindley in 'Dispatches from Elsewhere'
Eve Lindley in ‘Dispatches from Elsewhere’ | Gilbert Carrasquillo/GC Images

What is the narrator lying about?

The show opens with a narrator, who begins by introducing the audience to one of the main characters, Peter. The narrator provides details about Peter’s home, job, and daily routine. At the end of the introduction, he confesses that he has lied once during his spiel, but assures the audience that they can trust him moving forward.

He appears again later in the episode, this time calling himself Octavio Coleman Esquire, founder of the Jejune Institute. Peter is at the Institute for an orientation and meets Coleman via video. He tells Peter that the organization’s goal is to “to illuminate the oneness” and to “highlight the illusion of separateness.” Coleman claims to target unique individuals to answer a special calling, but to what end?

At the end of the orientation, Coleman invites Peter to fill out an induction card with personal information. It appears that Peter is motivated to do just that until he finds a warning message saying not to trust the Jejune Institute, and urging him to run away immediately.

Viewers are left wondering a few things. What has Coleman, the narrator, lied about, what are the true motives of the Jejune Institute, and is Peter indeed in danger?

Is there a link between ‘Dispatches from Elsewhere’ and ‘The Matrix’?

Upon Peter’s escape from the Jejune Institute, he receives a phone call from Commander 14 of The Elsewhere Society. The Commander gives Peter specific instructions about how to escape and what to do next.

The exchange is reminiscent of the first time Morpheus and Neo communicate in The Matrix. Could the parallel between Dispatches from Elsewhere and The Matrix be a clue, or is it just a fun Easter egg for sci-fi lovers?

Why are Peter, Simone, Fredwynn, and Janice chosen?

By the end of the episode, Peter has been lured to an event organized by The Elsewhere Society. While there, he is matched with a team of three other individuals — Simone, Fredwynn, and Janice. The audience has yet to learn how they each became involved with The Elsewhere Society.

Through what is referred to as cryptic radio, The Elsewhere Society gives the participants information and a few warnings. The participants are now Agents of Nonchalance who should beware if Octavio Coleman, who is an opposer of The Elsewhere Society.

What is Divine Nonchalance, and who is Clara?

Divine Nonchalance is a recurring theme throughout the episode. The participants are challenged to find Clara, the keeper of Divine Nonchalance, before the false prophets locate her. The Elsewhere Society promises to reward whoever finds Clara first.

Each person in Peter’s group has an idea of what The Elsewhere Society’s true intentions are. Janice believes that the elaborate evening they experienced was a charade meant for one night of entertainment. But, Simone thinks it’s a game that will reward the winners with a television appearance.

Fredwynn is certain that they are a part of a social experiment controlled by the government. He notes that the operatives are tracking their personal data. Simone questions his sanity, and he quickly retorts that he earned a nearly perfect score on his SAT at the age of 13, and possesses a keen ability to detect patterns.

Peter is the only member of the group who ponders the idea that the situation could be real. Fans will not have to wait long to see who could be right. The new series premiered on Sunday, March 1, after The Walking Dead, but moves to its regular Monday at 10 p.m. time slot on March 2.

Read More: Who Stars in ‘Dispatches from Elsewhere’?