‘Doctor Strange 2’ Will Emulate These Scary Movies of Yesteryear

The idea that Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness will be a horror movie has been a widespread consensus as of late. Given the aesthetic approach to the title and the fact that Scott Derrickson is directing, The Multiverse of Madness seems destined for a horrifying future in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU). 

With various outlets like CinemaBlend and The Hollywood Reporter discussing the film’s horror inclinations, presumptions concerning the movie’s horror-centric focus continue to circulate the internet.

Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness actor Benedict Cumberbatch
Benedict Cumberbatch of Marvel Studios’ ‘Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness’ | Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images for Disney

Derrickson is well known for The Exorcism of Emily Rose, Deliver Us From Evil, and Sinister. All three of his most famous films fall into the horror genre, often calling upon spiritual elements to leave viewers trembling in anticipation. However, it’s important to note that Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness won’t be a horror flick exactly — not in the typical, contemporary sense of the word that is. 

The movie may possess scary scenes that leave you at the edge of your seat, but this will not be The Conjuring or Halloween. So, what should fans expect concerning the fear factor supposedly inherent to this upcoming MCU installment? 

‘Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness’ and its the approach to horror

As ComicBook.com notes, when Kevin Feige appeared as a guest at the New York Film Academy, he clarified some grave misconceptions surrounding Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness. He explained to fans who — based on previous reports had come to believe otherwise — that the movie will not be a horror flick, but rather, it will possess frightening moments. He stated:

I wouldn’t necessarily say that’s a horror film, but … it’ll be a big MCU film with scary sequences in it. 

Kevin Feige quoted by ComicBook.com

Kevin Feige went on to discuss movies that he feels fall within the same spectrum that The Multiverse of Madness will fall into. Kevin Feige looked back on his childhood, remembering movies that were too scary for a PG rating, but way too family-friendly for an R-rating; hence, he recalled the PG-13 films with moments that were, at times, a bit terrifying. He stated:

I mean, there are horrifying sequences in Raiders that I as a little kid would [cover my eyes] when their faces melted. Or Temple of Doom, of course, or Gremlins, or Poltergeist…These are the movies that invented the PG-13 rating, by the way. They were PG and then they were like, ‘We need another [rating].’ But that’s fun. It’s fun to be scared in that way, and not a horrific, torturous way, but a way that is legitimately scary — because Scott Derrickson is quite good at that — but scary in the service of an exhilarating emotion.

Kevin Feige quoted by ComicBook.com

In short, The Multiverse of Madness will likely emulate Gremlins, Temple of Doom, etc. in that the movie will not be a blood-splattering torture fest or a creepy-crawly, unsettling disaster. Instead, it will exploit what it feels like to be afraid — capitalizing on anticipation, the unknown, and the vast power of an unbridled imagination.