Jimmy Page Once Explained ‘What’s So Cool’ About All Guitar Playing, and He Has a Point

Jimmy Page is undoubtedly in the conversation as one of the greatest guitarists ever. The Led Zeppelin maestro found an abandoned guitar as a child, started playing it, and it changed his life. He’s a virtuoso on six strings, but Page once described what’s so cool about all guitar playing, and he makes a great point.

Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page, who made a great point when he explained why he thinks all guitar playing is astounding.
Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page | Mirrorpix via Getty Images

Jimmy Page once described why he believes all guitar playing is so cool

Many rock guitarists who came after Led Zeppelin looked up to and found inspiration in Page’s guitar playing. The memorable riffs and all-time great solos put him in the pantheon of rock gods. 

Yet Page once said he found something to love in all guitar playing, whether or not it was virtuostic (via YouTube):

“The thing is, I really love all guitar playing. That’s exactly the thing. Hearing guitarists when I was a kid and really appreciating, even then, that it’s six strings of an electric guitar, but everybody’s take on it and their whole character is totally different, and that’s what’s so cool about it.”

Jimmy Page explains why he finds all guitar-playing to be so cool

Page’s mix of songwriting skills and guitar chops made him one of the elite musicians of his time. Few could match his skills (or riff-writing that netted Led Zeppelin a $2 million paycheck). Still, Page found something exciting and unique in others’ guitar-playing regardless of their skill level, and he makes a great point.

Page is right that there’s something to love about nearly all guitar playing

RELATED: Jimmy Page Paid for Led Zeppelin’s 1st Record 

Cave paintings predate the guitar, but music might be one of the most primal forms of artistic expression. Most guitarists don’t have the same skill level as him, but Page still finds the act of any artist expressing themselves on six strings to be a cool experience.

Even if the music doesn’t spark joy, there’s still a way to appreciate the passion and creative energy that goes into artists expressing themselves through music. 

Johnny Ramone couldn’t hold a candle to Jimmy Page’s guitar-playing skills, but the punk pioneer found a way to express his passion and influence a new generation with his music. The Edge might rely on effects pedals to achieve his signature sound, but there’s no doubt that his character comes through in every song. Any guitar player can have a personal take, as Page said, not just technically proficient ones.

Immense talent can help a guitarist express themself in many ways, but Page is right that pure skill isn’t the only way to have a player’s character come through the speakers. 

Page had a method for mastering his guitar solos

RELATED: Jimmy Page’s Solo on the Final Led Zeppelin Song Remains a Stunning Closing Statement 

Page turned in a fantastic solo on Led Zeppelin’s “Stairway to Heaven,” though he rates “Achilles’ Last Stand” as the better performance. Before he ascended to those heights, though, he had to learn how to create a solo. He had a method for doing just that.

As with most things in life, it came down to practice.

Page would listen closely to Buddy Holly records and craft the chords into solos. Some of his early guitar-playing cohorts recall Page wearing out the grooves in records as he constantly re-listened to guitar parts while working out solos. 

The future Led Zeppelin ace then moved on to watching live performances. Before long, he backed a poet who gave Page a connection to how the Beatles got their name, became an ace studio musician, and eventually founded one of the most popular bands of all time.

Jimmy Page’s guitar playing is some of the best we’ve heard, but the master himself said there’s something cool about hearing anyone express themselves on six strings.

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