‘Nine Perfect Strangers’: Samara Weaving Says the Show Will Have a ‘Very Different’ Ending Than the Book

Nine Perfect Strangers is on track to become one of Hulu’s biggest original series, and given its all-star cast, that’s really no surprise. Boasting talent like Nicole Kidman, Melissa McCarthy, Bobby Cannavale, and Manny Jacinto — among others — the show drew in more viewers on its premiere date than any other Hulu original. Of course, the fact that Nine Perfect Strangers is based on a best-selling novel probably helped attract a dedicated fanbase. However, the ending of the show might diverge from the source material.

‘Nine Perfect Strangers’ is based on a book by Liane Moriarty

Hulu’s Nine Perfect Strangers is based on the best-selling novel by Liane Moriarty, the author who penned Big Little Lies. The book follows the same general premise as the show, seeing nine individuals embark on a wellness journey at a place called Tranquillum House. During their 10-day retreat, the group attempts to overcome their grief and trauma. However, the book doesn’t delve as deeply into the characters as the on-screen adaptation does.

The show has also taken liberties with the source material, adding details and storylines that weren’t included in Moriarty’s narrative. That’s par for the course when bringing a story from the page to the screen. According to one of the series’ stars, the ending may switch things up even more.

Samara Weaving says the Hulu series will have a ‘very different’ ending

'Nine Perfect Strangers' star Samara Weaving. She's wearing a green button-up blouse and looking to the left of the camera. She's smiling.
‘Nine Perfect Strangers’ star Samara Weaving | Jim Spellman/Getty Images

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Although Nine Perfect Strangers has a novel to pull material from, the Hulu series has already started altering some of the characters’ storylines. According to Samara Weaving, who plays Jessica Chandler in the show, that will continue into the finale. In fact, the actor told Digital Spy that several of the characters will find themselves in a different place than their book counterparts by the final episode:

“The script is very different from the book in that it ends very differently for a lot of different characters. “Masha [Nicole Kidman] has a very different arc, so it’ll be interesting to see what people think.”

With Masha, she’s likely referring to the fact that Kidman’s character has been receiving anonymous threats. That storyline is missing from Moriarty’s book, but it’s added an element of suspense to the adaptation.

Weaving’s character has been given additional depth as well, with the writers having her deal with body dysmorphia in the Hulu series. This adds an interesting new layer to Jessica, but Weaving is glad she read the book.

“I think in a book you can really see what’s going on inside someone’s head and you get a really honest perspective of what someone’s thinking about, whereas the script, it’s just as great, but there was a really in-depth study of Jessica in the book that I definitely took,” Weaving explained.

How did the book ‘Nine Perfect Strangers’ end?

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The book version of Nine Perfect Strangers contains several threads included in the show, from Frances (Melissa McCarthy) and Tony’s (Bobby Cannavale) blossoming romance to Lars’ (Luke Evans) and Carmel’s (Regina Hall) woes with their exes. In Moriarty’s novel, the characters mostly receive happy endings. Even those who aren’t able to completely repair their problems learn to make peace with them. However, with all the threats coming Masha’s way, the series may take a darker turn during its final episodes.

Fans won’t know what Hulu tosses and what it keeps until the final four chapters of Nine Perfect Strangers arrive. In the meantime, they can compare the first half of the series to Moriarty’s novel. That may give them a better idea of where things are headed — and if they bear any resemblance to the novel.