Quentin Tarantino and Jordan Peele Convinced Edgar Wright to Keep This ‘Last Night in Soho’ Easter Egg

Quentin Tarantino, Jordan Peele, and Edgar Wright are all high-accomplished filmmakers who have close attention to detail. Some filmmakers show their peers their work in advance to get feedback. Wright previously showed Last Night in Soho to Mad Max: Fury Road‘s George Miller. However, Tarantino and Peele’s comment kept one easter egg entirely intact in the Last Night in Soho final cut.

‘Last Night in Soho’ brings audiences to the 1960s

'Last Night in Soho' stars Anya Taylor-Joy and Matt Smith embracing each other in front of a phone
L-R: Anya Taylor-Joy and Matt Smith | Focus Features

Eloise (Thomasin McKenzie) moves to London to pursue school to become a fashion designer. She has the amazing ability to enter the 1960s, where she encounters a wannabe singer (Anya Taylor-Joy). Eloise found the life that she’s always wanted. However, everything turns on its head when the past and the present begin to merge into something terrifying.

Wright directs a screenplay that he co-wrote with Krysty Wilson-Cairns. Last Night in Soho embraces Eloise’s passion for the 1960s throughout the movie. The time period inspires her fashion designs, but the production design and the music also perfectly capture the tone.

Quentin Tarantino and Jordan Peele are responsible for Edgar Wright keeping one easter egg

Wright talked with Den of Geek about Last Night in Soho. There’s a scene in the trailer that shows Eloise stepping out of an alley into a 1960s Soho. A huge marquee displays a poster for Sean Connery as James Bond in Thunderball. However, this easter egg almost didn’t make it into the movie.

Wright expressed interest in changing the marquee to show The Fantastic Voyage. This was intended to show that Eloise is about to embark on a voyage of her own. However, two issues stood in the way of that happening, including the movie’s time period.

“There was a discrepancy of what year [Fantastic Voyage] came out,” Wright said. “And something said 1965 was when it was made and premiered, but 1966 was the main release.”

The second issue appeared when Wright showed the Last Night in Soho trailer to Tarantino and Peele. Their comments immediately sent Wright into returning back to Thunderball.

“I’d shown the trailer to a couple friends of mine, Quentin Tarantino and Jordan Peele,” Wright said. “And both of them said the same thing. ‘Oh, man I love that shot with the Thunderball poster.’ So I called the VFX person and said, ‘Hey, guys, change it back to Thunderball. Change of plan, get rid of Fantastic Voyage!”

‘Last Night in Soho’ relied on production design

Last Night in Soho went to great lengths to ensure that the movie properly displayed the 1960s. The movie even accomplishes to transform the streets of London themselves.

“I think something people would be surprised about with the film is how much of the ‘60s period detail is really there,” Wright told Den of Geek. “Because there’s some digital work in the distance where you’re painting out modern things, but Marcus Rowland, our amazing production designer, did redress significant parts of London streets in the center of London.”

Last Night in Soho is playing exclusively in theaters starting Oct. 29.

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