Mick Jagger’s Response When Asked If ‘Their Satanic Majesties Request’ Was Supposed to Sound Like The Beatles’ ‘Strawberry Fields Forever’

TL;DR:

  • The Beatles’ “Strawberry Fields Forever” predates The Rolling Stones’ ‘Their Satanic Majesties Request.’
  • Jagger said his favorite song from the album sounded terrible in stereo.
  • Jagger was asked if The Rolling Stones were trying to mimic one of The Beatles’ songs.
The Beatles’ Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr, John Lennon, and George Harrison in a row
The Beatles’ Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr, John Lennon, and George Harrison | John Pratt/Keystone/Getty Images

The Rolling StonesTheir Satanic Majesties Request (1967) embraced psychedelia more than their other work. A journalist asked Mick Jagger if the album sounded like The Beatles’ “Strawberry Fields Forever.” Notably, Jagger said a song from the album sounded “lousy in stereo.”

Mick Jagger was asked if The Rolling Stones’ ‘Their Satanic Majesties Request’ was about dreaming

During a 1968 interview with Rolling Stone, Jagger discussed the album Their Satanic Majesties Request (1967). The interviewer said Their Satanic Majesties Request seemed to be about sleeping and dreaming. “I read somewhere else that it was supposed to be about traveling, which is weird too ’cause it is when you come to look at it that way,” he said. 

Jagger responded to the interviewer’s interpretation of the album. “You heard what?” he said. “Dreaming and waking up? I don’t know, maybe it is. That’s great if you get that from it, that’s fantastic.”

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Mick Jagger dodged a question about ‘Their Satanic Majesties Request’ and The Beatles’ ‘Strawberry Fields Forever’

Certain words appeared and repaired in the album’s lyrics. “I don’t know what to think about it,” Jagger said. “It’s very weird really and doesn’t have anything to do with me. It hasn’t got any sort of songs in it, all the words are very obscure, no they aren’t really. ‘2000 Light Years [From Home]’ isn’t. That is my favorite but it’s lousy in stereo.”

Subsequently, Jagger was asked if Their Satanic Majesties Request was supposed to sound like The Beatles’ “Strawberry Fields Forever.” Notably, Their Satanic Majesties Request and “Strawberry Fields Forever” are both examples of psychedelic music. Jagger didn’t directly answer the question. “Well it’s a very heady album, very spaced out,” he said.

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How The Rolling Stones’ ‘2000 Light Years from Home’ and The Beatles’ ‘Strawberry Fields Forever’ performed on the charts

“2000 Light Years from Home” did not chart on the Billboard Hot 100. The track’s parent album, Their Satanic Majesties Request, was far more popular. The album reached No. 2 on the Billboard 200, remaining on the chart for a total of 30 weeks.

On the other hand, “Strawberry Fields Forever” became far more popular in the United States. It reached No. 8 on the Billboard Hot 100, staying on the chart for nine weeks. The track appeared on some editions of the album Magical Mystery Tour. The album topped the Billboard 200 for eight of its 93 weeks on the chart.

Their Satanic Majesties Request was a hit — whether or not it sounds like “Strawberry Fields Forever.”

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